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Latest Neuroanatomy Stories

2012-08-01 11:33:14

Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers, working with colleagues in Canada, have found that one or more substances produced by a type of immune cell in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) may play a role in the disease's progression. The finding could lead to new targeted therapies for MS treatment. B cells, said Robert Lisak, M.D., professor of neurology at Wayne State and lead author of the study, are a subset of lymphocytes (a type of circulating white blood cell) that...

2012-07-27 13:52:36

UCLA researchers say blocking this molecule may improve and speed recovery FINDINGS: Researchers at UCLA have identified a novel molecule in the brain that, after stroke, blocks the formation of new connections between neurons. As a result, it limits the brain's recovery. In a mouse model, the researchers showed that blocking this molecule–called ephrin-A5--induces axonal sprouting, that is, the growth of new connections between the brain's neurons, or cells, and as a result...

2012-07-26 01:06:23

Several years ago, Prof. Michael Fainzilber and his group in the Biological Chemistry Department made a surprising discovery: Proteins thought to exist only near the cell nucleus could also be found in the far-off regions of the body's longest cells — peripheral nerve cells that extend processes called axons, reaching up to a meter in length in adult humans. These proteins, known as importins, have a well-studied role in the vicinity of the nucleus: They shuttle various molecules...

2012-07-25 00:19:18

Neuroscientists from Wayne State University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are taking a deeper look into how the brain mechanisms for memory retrieval differ between adults and children. While the memory systems are the same in many ways, the researchers have learned that crucial functions with relevance to learning and education differ. The team's findings were published on July 17, 2012, in the Journal of Neuroscience. According to lead author Noa Ofen, Ph.D.,...

2012-07-20 12:31:18

Korean scientists have used tiny stars, squares and triangles as a toolkit to create live neural circuits in a dish. They hope the shapes can be used to create a reproducible neural circuit model that could be used for learning and memory studies as well as drug screening applications; the shapes could also be integrated into the latest neural tissue scaffolds to aid the regeneration of neurons at injured sites in the body, such as the spinal cord. Published today, 20 July, in IOP...

Dopamine Has Many Messages
2012-07-18 14:59:38

In the insect brain, dopamine-releasing nerve cells are crucial to the formation of both punished and rewarded memories Children quickly learn to avoid negative situations and seek positive ones. But humans are not the only species capable of remembering positive and negative events; even the small brain of a fruit fly has this capacity. Dopamine-containing nerve cells connected with the mushroom body of the fly brain play a role here. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of...

2012-07-16 23:02:09

AxoGen announces shipment to Italian distributor following approval by the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute. Alachua, FL (PRWEB) July 16, 2012 AxoGen, Inc. (OTCBB:AXGN), a leading regenerative medicine company focused on the development and commercialization of products and technologies for peripheral nerve reconstruction and regeneration, today announced approval by the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute of its first commercial shipment of Avance® Nerve Graft to MD for Life, its new...

2012-07-16 10:19:02

Disruption of cytoskeleton pathways contribute to ALS pathogenesis A new genetic mutation that causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurological disorder also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, has been identified by a team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS). Mutations to the profilin (PFN1) gene, which is essential to the growth and development of nerve cell axons, is estimated to account for one to two percent of...

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2012-07-12 13:28:12

John Neumann for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Every kid knows that we taste with our tongues, however those in the know, understand that this is a very rudimentary viewpoint. When it comes to flavor, the tongue is very basic. Most of our experience of flavor comes from our olfactory system: our nose and sinuses. Professor Barry Smith, director of the Centre for the Study of the Senses at the University of London, explains, “Not only is it not just about your tongue. Very...

The Visually Impaired Reach For Objects In Space Using Device That Converts Images Into Music
2012-07-05 12:07:20

Research results reported in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience Sensory substitution devices (SSDs) use sound or touch to help the visually impaired perceive the visual scene surrounding them. The ideal SSD would assist not only in sensing the environment but also in performing daily activities based on this input. For example, accurately reaching for a coffee cup, or shaking a friend's hand. In a new study, scientists trained blindfolded sighted participants to perform fast and...


Latest Neuroanatomy Reference Libraries

Midbrain
2013-07-25 15:13:23

The midbrain, also known as the mesencephalon is the part of the brain most responsible for vision, motor control, arousal, temperature regulation, alertness and hearing. Formation and Orientation The midbrain is found under the cerebral cortex and above the hindbrain. The mesencephalon is not divided into any other portions of the brain unlike the other two vesicles that stem from the neural tube. There are four separate lobes on the side of the cerebral aqueduct within the...

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.