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Latest Neuroanatomy Stories

Promising Nerve Research From Stem Cells Plus Nanofibers
2012-11-07 15:29:57

University of Michigan Health System Researchers coax cells to grow and myelinate along thin fibers, with potential use in testing treatments for neurological diseases Every week in his clinic at the University of Michigan, neurologist Joseph Corey, M.D., Ph.D., treats patients whose nerves are dying or shrinking due to disease or injury. He sees the pain, the loss of ability and the other effects that nerve-destroying conditions cause — and wishes he could give patients more...

rhesus monkey
2012-11-07 14:49:05

Jedidiah Becker for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online In 2005, Norwegian researchers discovered a previously unknown type of neuron by placing electrodes deep within the cerebral cortex of rats. Dubbed “grid cells,” these specialized neurons were so named because they fire in distinct clusters, each of which constitutes the vertex of a grid-like pattern of equilateral triangles. This recurring triangular, lattice-like firing pattern is what distinguishes grid cells from other...

2012-11-02 14:49:03

World-leading experts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging from The University of Nottingham´s Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre have made a key discovery which could give the medical world a new tool for the improved diagnosis and monitoring of neuro-degenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis. The new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, reveals why images of the brain produced using the latest MRI techniques are so sensitive to the...

Prefrontal Cortex Controls Habits
2012-10-30 19:33:47

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Neuroscientists have identified a region of the brain that is capable of switching between new and old habits. A new study by MIT neuroscientists has found a wall region of the brain's prefrontal cortex is responsible for moment-by-moment control of which habits are switched on at a given time. “We´ve always thought – and I still do – that the value of a habit is you don´t have to think about it. It...

2012-10-30 12:35:05

A study in The Journal of Cell Biology shows how a transcription factor called STAT3 remains in the axon of nerve cells to help prevent neurodegeneration. The findings could pave the way for future drug therapies to slow nerve damage in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. In Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS) and other neurodegenerative diseases, nerve cells usually die in stages, with axons deteriorating first and the cells themselves perishing later. Axon degeneration may represent a...

Monkeys Deconstruct The World Through Triangular Grids
2012-10-29 09:16:42

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at Emory University have shown that some primates visually deconstruct the world through triangular grids. According to their report in the journal Nature, the scientists have identified grid cells in the brains of rhesus monkeys that fire in triangular patterns as their eyes scan a scene. Uncovering this brain activity in primates could have larger ramifications as the grid cells are connected to how we view and recall...

2012-10-17 14:12:44

-A new study examined what brain volume recovery may take place during the first 14 days of abstinence from alcohol. -Findings indicate that recovery of cerebral gray matter volume can begin for alcoholic patients after only a few days of detoxification. -Recovery may vary among brain regions. Chronic alcohol abuse can severely damage the nervous system, particularly cognitive functions, cerebral metabolism, and brain morphology. Building upon previous findings that alcoholics can...

Most Annoying Sound Ever
2012-10-13 09:14:36

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online There are noises that set our teeth on edge, make us recoil, and generally unnerve us. For me, that noise is the sound of someone popping his or her back. Scientists from Newcastle University and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging say heightened activity between the emotional and auditory areas of the brain can explain why the sound of chalk on a blackboard, a knife on a bottle, or a joint popping is so unpleasant. A new...

Early Warning System For Struggling Young Readers
2012-10-12 05:18:35

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It is already known that if a 7-year-old is easily reading the "Harry Potter" books, he or she will be a strong reader later in life. It is also a given that if a 7-year-old is struggling with "The Cat in the Hat," that child will mostly likely struggle with reading from there on out. A new study from Stanford University demonstrates that brain scans can identify the neural differences between the two readers. These scans might...

2012-10-10 19:22:54

JUPITER, Fla., Oct. 10, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Dr. Jerry Jacobson, biophysicist and inventor, announced today the results of studies on the effect of extremely low intensity electromagnetic fields on the restoration of forelimb grip strength, and radial nerve ultrastructure in mice with induced motor neuropathy. After administration of neurotoxin, mice persisted to exhibit a 56% decrease in grip strength; and radial nerve electron micrographs showed axonal demyelination, inactive mitochondria...


Latest Neuroanatomy Reference Libraries

Midbrain
2013-07-25 15:13:23

The midbrain, also known as the mesencephalon is the part of the brain most responsible for vision, motor control, arousal, temperature regulation, alertness and hearing. Formation and Orientation The midbrain is found under the cerebral cortex and above the hindbrain. The mesencephalon is not divided into any other portions of the brain unlike the other two vesicles that stem from the neural tube. There are four separate lobes on the side of the cerebral aqueduct within the...

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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