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Latest Neurobiology Stories

2014-09-30 23:18:01

Best Paper awarded to study on use of Avance® Nerve Graft in long nerve discontinuities Alachua, FL (PRWEB) September 30, 2014 AxoGen, Inc. (NASDAQ: AXGN), a leading medical technology company focused on the peripheral nerve repair market, announced the presentation of clinical data for Avance® Nerve Graft during the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) 2014 Annual Meeting which took place last week in Boston. The ASSH Best Paper Award was given to ”Functional...

2014-09-26 12:23:14

CINCINNATI, Sept. 26, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- New research shows that disrupting the molecular function of a tumor suppressor causes improper formation of a protective insulating sheath on peripheral nerves - leading to neuropathy and muscle wasting in mice similar to that in human diabetes and neurodegeneration. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20110406/MM79025LOGO Scientists from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report their findings online Sept. 26 in...

2014-08-28 23:05:28

This webinar will provide experienced and novice researchers with an overview of the current optical imaging methods driving neuroscience today. Part of the BioTechniques free webinar series. New York, NY (PRWEB) August 28, 2014 In the coming years, considerable effort and resources will be directed at understanding the neural connections of the brain. This webinar examines many of the tools being used to study how neurons interact with one another at their synapses. Event Date: Tuesday,...

2014-08-25 23:01:57

PDL BioPharma President & CEO John McLaughlin to step down. Alachua, FL (PRWEB) August 25, 2014 AxoGen, Inc. (NASDAQ: AXGN), a leading medical technology company focused on the peripheral nerve repair market, reported today that John McLaughlin, President and Chief Executive Officer of PDL BioPharma, Inc. has resigned from AxoGen’s Board of Directors. Mr. McLaughlin joined AxoGen’s Board in 2012 as part of the Revenue Interest Purchase Agreement between AxoGen and PDL. At this...

2014-08-18 16:28:15

WELLESLEY, Mass., Aug. 18, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new study by Barbara Beltz, the Allene Lummis Russell Professor of Neuroscience at Wellesley College, and Irene Soderhall of Uppsala University, Sweden, published in the August 11 issue of the journal Developmental Cell, demonstrates that the immune system can produce cells with stem cell properties, using crayfish as a model system. These cells can, in turn, create neurons in the adult animal. The flexibility of immune...

2014-08-07 15:39:20

Salk Institute Scientists hope to borrow strategy from simpler animals to repair damaged spinal cord nerves in humans Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is—while many animals have this ability, humans don't. But new research from the Salk Institute suggests that a small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to grow and effectively rewire circuits. Such a feat could eventually lead to therapies for the...

2014-07-15 23:00:28

Researchers at UC Davis School of Medicine have for the first time shown that a polysialylated glycoprotein that regulates neurodevelopment exists on the surface of cells in the adult inner ear. Sacramento, Calif. (PRWEB) July 15, 2014 Researchers at UC Davis School of Medicine have for the first time shown that a polysialylated glycoprotein that regulates neurodevelopment exists on the surface of cells in the adult inner ear. This biomarker of early cells allows researchers to identify...

2014-06-25 10:25:31

Ohio State University Study in mice suggests immune cells fail to activate key messenger needed for repair In the complex environment of a spinal cord injury, researchers have found that immune cells in the central nervous system of elderly mice fail to activate an important signaling pathway, dramatically lowering chances for repair after injury. These studies were the first to show that spinal cord injuries are more severe in elderly mice than in young adults, corroborating...

2014-06-25 10:21:35

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory There are new clues about malfunctions in brain cells that contribute to intellectual disability and possibly other developmental brain disorders. Professor Linda Van Aelst of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has been scrutinizing how the normal version of a protein called OPHN1 helps enable excitatory nerve transmission in the brain, particularly at nerve-cell docking ports containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Her team's new work, published June 24 in...

2014-06-18 23:11:38

Expanded outcomes data from the Ranger® Registry to be presented Alachua, FL (PRWEB) June 18, 2014 AxoGen, Inc. (NASDAQ: AXGN), a leading medical technology company focused on the peripheral nerve repair market, today announced the acceptance of two clinical presentations on the use of Avance® Nerve Graft and a scientific presentation on the use of coaptation aids in nerve repair at the 29th Congress of the Federation of European Societies for Surgery of the Hand (FESSH), June...


Latest Neurobiology Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
ween
  • To think; to imagine; to fancy.
  • To be of opinion; have the notion; think; imagine; suppose.
The word 'ween' comes from Middle English wene, from Old English wēn, wēna ("hope, weening, expectation"), from Proto-Germanic *wēniz, *wēnōn (“hope, expectation”), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, love, want, reach, win”).
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