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Latest Neurobiology Stories

2014-07-15 23:00:28

Researchers at UC Davis School of Medicine have for the first time shown that a polysialylated glycoprotein that regulates neurodevelopment exists on the surface of cells in the adult inner ear. Sacramento, Calif. (PRWEB) July 15, 2014 Researchers at UC Davis School of Medicine have for the first time shown that a polysialylated glycoprotein that regulates neurodevelopment exists on the surface of cells in the adult inner ear. This biomarker of early cells allows researchers to identify...

2014-06-25 10:25:31

Ohio State University Study in mice suggests immune cells fail to activate key messenger needed for repair In the complex environment of a spinal cord injury, researchers have found that immune cells in the central nervous system of elderly mice fail to activate an important signaling pathway, dramatically lowering chances for repair after injury. These studies were the first to show that spinal cord injuries are more severe in elderly mice than in young adults, corroborating...

2014-06-25 10:21:35

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory There are new clues about malfunctions in brain cells that contribute to intellectual disability and possibly other developmental brain disorders. Professor Linda Van Aelst of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has been scrutinizing how the normal version of a protein called OPHN1 helps enable excitatory nerve transmission in the brain, particularly at nerve-cell docking ports containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Her team's new work, published June 24 in...

2014-06-18 23:11:38

Expanded outcomes data from the Ranger® Registry to be presented Alachua, FL (PRWEB) June 18, 2014 AxoGen, Inc. (NASDAQ: AXGN), a leading medical technology company focused on the peripheral nerve repair market, today announced the acceptance of two clinical presentations on the use of Avance® Nerve Graft and a scientific presentation on the use of coaptation aids in nerve repair at the 29th Congress of the Federation of European Societies for Surgery of the Hand (FESSH), June...

2014-06-17 10:58:53

University of California - San Diego Some neurons turn to neighbors to help take out the trash It's broadly assumed that cells degrade and recycle their own old or damaged organelles, but researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Kennedy Krieger Institute have discovered that some neurons transfer unwanted mitochondria – the tiny power plants inside cells – to supporting glial cells called astrocytes...

fruit fly escape
2014-06-10 08:57:04

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The flight of a fruit fly, as determined by a recent study, is dependent upon whether or not the fly perceives a threat. Scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus have successfully discovered the brain processes engaged in standard flight and the more rapid escape flight. A quick-escape circuit in the fly's brain overrides the slower, more controlled behavior as a threat looms large over the...

2014-06-04 23:10:04

$1.9 Million in Grant funding will explore application of novel stem cells and development of branched grafts for complex nerve repair Alachua, FL (PRWEB) June 04, 2014 AxoGen, Inc. (NASDAQ: AXGN), the emerging leader of the $1.6 billion U.S. peripheral nerve repair market, announced today that it would share in the award of two Department of Defense Grants totaling approximately $1.9 million with Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston (BWH). The grants, awarded to Principal...

2014-05-21 13:47:49

Brandeis University A new model to understand neural self-regulation When your car needs a new spark plug, you take it to a shop where it sits, out of commission, until the repair is finished. But what if your car could replace its own spark plug while speeding down the Mass Pike? Of course, cars can't do that, but our nervous system does the equivalent, rebuilding itself continually while maintaining full function. Neurons live for many years but their components, the proteins...

2014-04-28 23:08:35

Company to feature portfolio of products for peripheral nerve repair, protection and regeneration at ACOMS Annual Meeting Alachua, FL (PRWEB) April 28, 2014 AxoGen, Inc. (NASDAQ: AXGN), the emerging leader of the $1.6 billion U.S. peripheral nerve repair market, announced today that it will be highlighting its products at the American College of Oral and Maxillofacial (ACOMS) 35th Annual Scientific Conference and Exhibition, April 27-30 in Las Vegas, Nevada. AxoGen is exhibiting its full...

2014-04-11 15:10:33

Fresh insights into the processes that control brain cell production could pave the way for treatments for brain cancer and other brain-related disorders. Scientists have gained new understanding of the role played by a key molecule that controls how and when nerve and brain cells are formed – a process that allows the brain to develop and keeps it healthy. Their findings could help explain what happens when cell production goes out of control, which is a fundamental characteristic of...


Latest Neurobiology Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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