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Latest Neurobiology Stories

2012-03-08 14:50:09

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have documented a previously unknown biological mechanism in the brain's most important line of defense: the blood-brain barrier. Scientists now know that the barrier helps maintain a delicate balance of glutamate, a vital signal compound in the brain. The research results have just been published in the scientific journal GLIA. Glutamate is the most important activating transmitter substance in the brain. Vital in small amounts, it is toxic for...

2012-03-07 11:30:16

Animal study suggests new strategy for treating depression Getting rid of a protein increases the birth of new nerve cells and shortens the time it takes for antidepressants to take effect, according to an animal study in the March 7 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The protein, neurofibromin 1, normally helps prevent uncontrolled cell growth. The findings suggest therapeutic strategies aimed at stimulating new nerve cell birth may help treat depression better than current...

2012-02-23 10:14:09

A new study reveals a dazzling degree of biological diversity in an unexpected place — a single neural connection in the body wall of flies. The finding, reported in this week's online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, raises several interesting questions about the importance of structure in the nervous system and the evolution of neural wiring. "We know almost nothing about the evolution of the nervous system, although we know it has to happen...

2012-02-21 06:06:12

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Recent research has shown that Alzheimer's drugs, which are in clinical trials still, have adverse side effects. The drugs are designed to prevent BACE1, the enzyme Robert Vassar originally discovered that promotes the development of clumps of plaque associated with Alzheimer's.  BACE1 cuts up and releases proteins that form the plaque, making those who developed the drug believe that by blocking the enzyme the development of Alzheimer's disease might slow down....

2012-02-20 12:56:23

Drugs may act like bad electrician, messing up wiring in brain and nervous system Alzheimer's disease drugs now being tested in clinical trials may have potentially adverse side effects, according to new Northwestern Medicine research. A study with mice suggests the drugs could act like a bad electrician, causing neurons to be miswired and interfering with their ability to send messages to the brain. The findings, from the scientist whose original research led to the drug development,...

2012-02-03 19:00:59

Team apply new procedure to rapidly induce nerve regeneration in mammals American scientists believe a new procedure to repair severed nerves could result in patients recovering in days or weeks, rather than months or years. The team used a cellular mechanism similar to that used by many invertebrates to repair damage to nerve axons. Their results are published today in the Journal of Neuroscience Research. "We have developed a procedure which can repair severed nerves within minutes so...

2012-01-20 11:06:41

Fruit flies don't have noses, but a huge part of their brains is dedicated to processing smells. Flies probably rely on the sense of smell more than any other sense for essential activities such as finding mates and avoiding danger.  UW-Madison researchers have discovered that a gene called distal-less is critical to the fly's ability to receive, process and respond to smells. As reported in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists...

2012-01-14 01:37:42

The blood-brain barrier is essential for maintaining the brain's stable environment–preventing entry of harmful viruses and bacteria and isolating the brain's specific hormonal and neurotransmitter activity from that in the rest of the body. In addition to nerve cells, the brain contains glia cells that support and protect the neurons. In the fruit fly, the blood-brain boundary is made by glia joined into an envelope sealed around the nerve cells. As the brain rapidly expands during...

2012-01-12 21:10:20

For years, researchers seeking new therapies for traumatic brain injury have been tantalized by the results of animal experiments with stem cells. In numerous studies, stem cell implantation has substantially improved brain function in experimental animals with brain trauma. But just how these improvements occur has remained a mystery. Now, an important part of this puzzle has been pieced together by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. In experiments with...


Latest Neurobiology Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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