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Birdsongs Automatically Decoded By Computer Scientists

Birdsongs Automatically Decoded By Computer Scientists

Queen Mary, University of London Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike. The...

Latest Neuroethology Stories

2014-06-28 13:07:37

University of Missouri The evolution of language in humans continues to perplex scientists and linguists who study how humans learn to communicate. Considered by some as “operant learning,” this multi-tiered trait involves many genes and modification of an individual’s behavior by trial and error. Toddlers acquire communication skills by babbling until what they utter is rewarded; however, the genes involved in learning language skills are far from completely understood. Now, using a...

New Weakly Electric Fish Species Reflects Hope For Peace In Central Africa
2014-04-11 14:05:39

Pensoft Publishers Two new species of weakly electric fishes from the Congo River basin are described in the open access journal ZooKeys. One of them, known from only a single specimen, is named "Petrocephalus boboto." "Boboto" is the word for peace in the Lingala language, the lingua franca of the Congo River, reflecting the authors' hope for peace in troubled Central Africa. On a 2010 field trip to the Congo River of Democratic Republic of the Congo, in the riverside village of...

big brown bat in flight
2014-03-29 05:33:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While experts have long known that bats use ultrasonic calls to locate insect prey, research published earlier this week reveals that males have a second distinctive set that essentially allows them to call dibs on a potential meal. The new study, which appears in Thursday’s edition of the journal Current Biology, explained that there is a correlation between these special sounds and changes in the flight behavior of other bats....

2014-03-27 23:04:03

University of Maryland scientists discover that male big brown bats emit a special call - different than the ones they use to navigate in flight - that tells their comrades to “back off” from bugs they’ve claimed for themselves. A video animation in .mov format is available on request. College Park, MD (PRWEB) March 27, 2014 Look into the spring sky at dusk and you may see flitting groups of bats, gobbling up insect meals in an intricately choreographed aerial dance. It’s well...

2014-03-27 16:22:01

COLLEGE PARK, Md., March 27, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Look up into the sky at dusk this spring and you're likely to see small groups of bats flitting here and there, gobbling up their insect meals in an intricately choreographed aerial dance. It's well known that echolocation calls keep the bats from hitting trees and each other. But now scientists have learned some bats emit another call: one that tells their comrades to "back off" from bugs they've claimed for themselves....

Ripple Effect Used By Bats When Hunting Frogs During Mating Season
2014-01-24 12:56:12

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As male túngara frogs call from their puddles to attract females, they create ripples that spread across the water. According to researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama, these ripples are used by other male frogs to assess their competition – and also by bats looking for their next meal. If it sees a bat flying overhead, a male túngara will stop calling – yet ripples continue moving for several...

Invisible Light Patterns Help Bees Find Food Even On Cloudy Days
2014-01-08 05:06:45

Ranjini Raghunath for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Bees are excellent navigators. Once they stumble upon a food source, they keep coming back to the same spot without faltering. They also have a great sense of smell and can recognize color patterns and symmetry in flowers – admirable feats for an insect whose brain is the size of a sesame seed. Scientists have long known that bees use the sunlight like a compass to map their route to the flowers full of succulent dew. They also...

Bats Rely On Vision To Navigate, Echolocation To Catch Insects: Study
2013-12-13 07:34:50

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online\ Bats rule the night skies, using the power of echolocation, or reflected sound. More than 1,000 species of echolocating bats exist, compared to just 80 species of nocturnal non-echolocating birds. It seems that normal vision works in tandem with echolocation to give bats an evolutionary edge, however, no one knows exactly how. A new study, led by Arjan Boonman and Yossi Yovel of Tel Aviv University's Department of Zoology, suggests...

Nectar Bat Uses Stealthy Moves To Catch Its Evening Dinner
2013-12-12 15:39:25

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research shows the Pallas long-tongued bat is a very stealthy predator when it comes to catching insects. Previously, scientists believed the nectar-feeding bat ate insects in passing, but the latest research shows it targets its moving prey with stealthy precision. The team proved for the first time that the Pallas long-tongued bat uses a stealthier form of echolocation. Echolocation is a physical trait that involves the...

2013-12-05 10:23:28

Attracting katydid females in the presence of a masking sound As darkness descends upon the tropical rainforests of Malaysia, male chirping katydids of the Mecopoda complex are just getting warmed up for their usual nightly concerts to woo the females. These nocturnal suitors are favoured for chirping in synchrony as a chorus; however, singing in time with one another is no easy task as they have to co-ordinate in the presence of the noisy serenades from a very closely related katydid...


Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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