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Latest Neuroethology Stories

2012-06-20 12:07:22

iPod owners aren't the only ones who frequently shuffle their favorite tunes. Baby songbirds do it, too, a new study shows. A baby songbird prefers to learn the clearest versions of songs he hears and uses them to build his personal playlist for life. As a result, noise, from nature and humans, influences which songs a bird learns to sing and can create lasting changes to his species' top tunes, the study's results suggest. "There's been an enormous amount of interest in how...

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2012-03-23 07:01:22

In the dark world of the underwater ocean, whales need to locate their prey accurately and quickly. In low-vision conditions whales use echolocation to find fish swimming nearby, and now it has been discovered that they can focus their acoustical “vision” to accurately located slightly differing objects. For this study, Laura Kloepper from the University of Hawaii and her her PhD supervisor, Paul Nachtigall, utilized the help of Kina the False Killer Whale, a species related to...

2012-03-01 20:30:00

Nesting season for birds is right around the corner. With it, homeowners and facility managers will be dealing with pest bird problems and looking for solutions. Ornithologist Dr. Rob Fergus weighs in on Ultrasonic Bird Control Devices to warn consumers during this time that ultrasonic devices do not repel birds. Dr. Fergus specializes in urban bird control and effective, humane solutions. Mission Viejo, CA (PRWEB) March 01, 2012 Spring and nesting season for birds is right around the...

2012-01-09 19:39:42

Pacific Southwest Research Station/USDA Forest Service Science that makes a difference... An interactive tool developed by researchers from the USDA Forest Service´s Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) will help wind energy facility operators make informed decisions on efficient ways to reduce impacts on migratory bats. Fatalities of migratory bats at wind energy facilities have become a frequent occurrence. Bat migration patterns are poorly understood and the relationship...

2011-11-28 15:15:07

By placing real and virtual objects in the flight paths of bats, scientists at the Universities of Bristol and Munich have shed new light on how echolocation works. Their research is published today in Behavioral Processes. The researchers found that it is not the intensity of the echoes that tells the bats the size of an object but the 'sonar aperture', that is the spread of angles from which echoes impinge on their ears. Echolocating bats emit calls for orientation. These calls bounce...

Bats Have Fastest Known Mammal Muscle
2011-09-30 05:04:01

Bats derive their ability to use echolocation, the bouncing of sound waves off objects to produce an accurate representation of the environment in total darkness, from so-called “superfast” muscles, researchers reported in latest issue of the journal Science. These superfast muscles, which are located in the bats´ larynx, are a physical trait never before seen in mammals, and allow the bate to make a rapid series of calls as they home in on their prey.   They...

2011-09-14 11:32:47

A new study reveals that the way fruit bats use biosonar to 'see' their surroundings is significantly more advanced than first thought. The study, published September 13 in the online, open access journal PLoS Biology, examines Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus), which use echolocation to orient inside their caves and to find fruit hidden in the branches of trees. Their high-frequency clicks form a sonar beam that spreads across a fan-shaped area, and the returning echoes allow them...

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2011-07-29 14:11:15

Scientists have found a rainforest vine that has evolved dish-shaped leaves to attract the bats that pollinate it. Tests found that the leaves were supremely efficient at bouncing back the sound pulses the flying mammals used to navigate. The bats were found to be able to locate the plant when the leaves were present twice as quickly as when they were removed. This study is the first to find a plant with "specialized acoustic features" to help bat pollinators find them using sound. Bats...

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2011-06-08 07:24:23

Dolphins and porpoises use echolocation for hunting and orientation. By sending out high-frequency sound, known as ultrasound, dolphins can use the echoes to determine what type of object the sound beam has hit. Researchers from Sweden and the US have now discovered that dolphins can generate two sound beam projections simultaneously. "The beam projections have different frequencies and can be sent in different directions. The advantage is probably that the dolphin can locate the object more...

2011-05-30 07:22:25

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Everybody has heard about echolocation in bats and dolphins. These creatures emit bursts of sounds and listen to the echoes that bounce back to detect objects in their environment. What is less well known is that people can echolocate, too. In fact, there are blind people who have learned to make clicks with their mouths and to use the returning echoes from those clicks to sense their surroundings. Some of these people are so adept at echolocation that they can use this...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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