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Latest Neurofibrillary tangle Stories

2008-07-30 03:00:15

Researchers at Scotland's University of Aberdeen say a new drug they've developed holds great promise in slowing the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The test patients who took the medication had an 81 percent reduction in cognitive decline in one year, the researchers' Phase 2 clinical trial found. The university's Claude Wischik, working with TauRx Therapeutics of Singapore, developed the novel treatment based on a new approach that targets the tangles -- aggregates of abnormal...

2008-07-28 15:00:22

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS--(Marketwire - July 28, 2008) - Allon Therapeutics Inc. (TSX:NPC) - A potential new treatment for Alzheimer's disease that reduces the classic Alzheimer's "tangle" pathology in mice has also improved specific memory function in humans with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), a precursor to Alzheimer's disease, according to a presentation today at a news conference hosted by the Alzheimer's Association at their International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease and...

2008-06-10 17:09:35

A Dutch woman who reached 115 years of age and remained mentally sharp throughout life also had a healthy brain when she died, a new study finds. The woman's brain showed almost no evidence of Alzheimer's disease. The finding suggests Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia are not inevitable, as had been suspected. "Our observations suggest that, in contrast to general belief, the limits of human cognitive function may extend far beyond the range that is currently...

2006-02-01 13:16:08

By Michelle Rizzo NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Brain lesions known as neurofibrillary tangles, such as those seen in Alzheimer's disease, are also associated with impaired gait in older subjects with or without dementia, according to a postmortem study. "The more tangles an older person had in the substantia nigra" - an area of the brain associated with Parkinson's disease -- "the more problems there were with gait," lead author Dr. Julie A. Schneider told Reuters Health. Results...

2005-07-24 18:26:11

CHICAGO - Researchers from the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center found that plaques and tangles in the brain, the changes seen in people with Alzheimer's disease (AD), are more likely to be expressed as dementia in women than in men. In the June 2005 issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, "Sex Differences in the Clinical Manifestations of Alzheimer Disease Pathology," principal investigator Lisa L. Barnes, PhD, sought to determine whether the relation between levels of AD pathology and...

2005-07-24 18:03:41

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) "“"“ A team of scientists has discovered three molecules "“"“ from a search of 58,000 compounds "“"“ that appear to inhibit a key perpetrator of Alzheimer's disease. Each of the three molecules protects the protein called "tau," which becomes hopelessly tangled in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's. The finding is promising news for the development of drugs for the disease. Ken Kosik, co-director of the Neuroscience Research...

2005-07-14 16:55:00

Researchers at the University of Minnesota were able to reverse memory loss in mice with significant brain degeneration for the first time, a breakthrough that offers hope to the estimated 4 million people living with Alzheimer's disease. Researchers first manipulated the genetic makeup of the mice so they developed dementia; the mice experienced memory loss that worsens over time and had brain atrophy similar to what a person with Alzheimer's disease goes through. The researchers further...

2005-07-14 13:03:49

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Tests on mice suggest the brain damage caused by Alzheimer's disease may be at least partly reversible, researchers reported Thursday. Their genetically altered mice regained the ability to navigate mazes after the genes that caused their dementia were de-activated. This suggests that the brain damage caused by Alzheimer's is not permanent, they wrote in their report, published in the journal Science. "I was...

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2005-07-14 14:33:08

WASHINGTON -- Tests on mice suggest the brain damage caused by Alzheimer's disease may be at least partly reversible, researchers reported Thursday. Their genetically altered mice regained the ability to navigate mazes after the genes that caused their dementia were de-activated. This suggests that the brain damage caused by Alzheimer's is not permanent, they wrote in their report, published in the journal Science. "I was astonished. I didn't believe the results when I saw them," said...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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