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Latest Neuroimaging Stories

2013-01-16 22:12:53

Findings also illustrate how individuals can train their brains to handle injuries more efficiently For the first time, scientists at Carnegie Mellon University's Center for Cognitive Brain Imaging (CCBI) have used a new combination of neural imaging methods to discover exactly how the human brain adapts to injury. The research, published in Cerebral Cortex, shows that when one brain area loses functionality, a "back-up" team of secondary brain areas immediately activates, replacing not...

Watching Sesame Street Helps Children’s’ Brain Develop Intellectual Abilities
2013-01-04 11:21:14

[Watch Video: Sesame Street Helps Brain Development] Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Using brain images, researchers are gaining insight into how humans process thought during real-life experiences. The same researchers studied brain scans of children and adults while they watched Sesame Street and found that a child´s brain changes as they develop intellectual abilities like reading and math. The scientists say that the novel use of brain imaging in this...

2013-01-02 10:42:12

Scientists have developed a quick, easy and cheap vision test to find out which part — and how much — of the brain of a stroke victim has been damaged, potentially enabling them to save more lives. The test requires patients to look into a device for about ten minutes, enabling it to be used in the early stages of a stroke — even if the patient cannot move their limbs or speak. This can help doctors diagnose and treat the stroke quickly and accurately, which is vital,...

Improving Alzheimer’s Prediction
2012-12-11 19:52:40

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online According to a new study published in the journal Radiology, a combination of a few diagnostic tests could improve prediction of Alzheimer's disease. More than 35 million people around the world are living with Alzheimer's disease, according to the World Health Organization. This disease is incurable and the prevalence is expected to double by 2030. "Although there is no cure for Alzheimer's disease, there are four...

Confidence Starts In The Brain
2012-12-10 05:31:59

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online If it seems as though some people are more confident in the decisions that they make than others, it's because of differences in how their brains are wired, a team of UK researchers have discovered. Writing in the journal Nature Neuroscience, Professor Ray Dolan and colleagues from the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London (UCL) have pinpointed the specific regions of the brain that work together to...

Visual Sensitivity Improved By Learning To Control Brain Activity
2012-12-05 15:46:31

Wellcome Trust Training human volunteers to control their own brain activity in precise areas of the brain can enhance fundamental aspects of their visual sensitivity, according to a new study. This non-invasive 'neurofeedback' approach could one day be used to improve brain function in patients with abnormal patterns of activity, for example stroke patients. Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at UCL used non-invasive, real-time brain imaging that enabled...

2012-11-27 15:30:30

Chemotherapy can induce changes in the brain that may affect concentration and memory, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Using positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT), researchers were able to detect physiological evidence of chemo brain, a common side effect in patients undergoing chemotherapy for cancer treatment. "The chemo brain phenomenon is described as 'mental fog' and 'loss...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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