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Latest Neurolinguistics Stories

Children See Improvement In Language When They Are Physically Fit
2014-06-03 13:56:12

Gerard LeBlond for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online Physically fit children are not only healthier, they have faster and more robust neuro-electrical brain responses while reading, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Illinois. The findings were published in the Brain and Cognition journal. Although the research doesn’t prove that higher fitness directly effects the changes in the electrical activity in the brain, it does offer a mechanism to explain why...

Grammatical Errors Detected When They Brain Is On Autopilot
2013-05-14 06:33:19

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Neuroscientists at the University of Oregon have captured conclusive evidence that people detect and process grammatical errors with no awareness of doing so. While the theory that the brain works on autopilot when it comes to grammar has been around for some time, hard evidence has been elusive. In the current study, native-English speaking participants ages 18-30 had their brain activity recorded using electroencephalography,...

2012-04-16 21:50:06

A network of brain regions which is activated during intense aesthetic experience overlaps with the brain network associated with inward contemplation and self-assessment, New York University researchers have found. Their study sheds new light on the nature of the aesthetic experience, which appears to integrate sensory and emotional reactions in a manner linked with their personal relevance. The study's co-authors were: Edward Vessel, a researcher in NYU's Center for Brain Imaging;...

2011-08-29 07:51:08

Babies and children are whizzes at learning a second language, but that ability begins to fade as early as their first birthdays. Researchers at the University of Washington's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences are investigating the brain mechanisms that contribute to infants' prowess at learning languages, with the hope that the findings could boost bilingualism in adults, too. In a new study, the researchers report that the brains of babies raised in bilingual households show...

2011-05-18 14:19:33

When we speak, our enunciation and pronunciation of words and syllables fluctuates and varies from person to person. Given this, how do infants decode all of the spoken sounds they hear to learn words and meanings? To replicate the challenges of learning language as an infant, Carnegie Mellon University's Lori Holt and Sung-Joo Lim and Stockholm University's Francisco Lacerda used video game training with a mock "alien" language. They discovered that listeners quickly recognize word-like...

2011-01-07 11:15:29

Babies, even those too young to talk, can understand many of the words that adults are saying "“ and their brains process them in a grown-up way. Combining the cutting-edge technologies of MRI and MEG, scientists at the University of California, San Diego show that babies just over a year old process words they hear with the same brain structures as adults, and in the same amount of time. Moreover, the researchers found that babies were not merely processing the words as sounds, but...

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2009-02-21 09:25:00

We engage in numerous discussions throughout the day, about a variety of topics, from work assignments to the Super Bowl to what we are having for dinner that evening. We effortlessly move from conversation to conversation, probably not thinking twice about our brain's ability to understand everything that is being said to us. How does the brain turn seemingly random sounds and letters into sentences with clear meaning? In a new report in Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'