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Latest Neurology Stories

2014-06-27 19:08:26

American Academy of Neurology Older veterans who have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are 60 percent more likely to later develop dementia than veterans without TBI, according to a study published in the June 25, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that veterans with a history of TBI developed dementia about two years earlier than those without TBI who had developed dementia. "These findings...

2014-06-27 19:06:16

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine A study published online today in Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach provides a different take on previous information regarding the prevalence of chronic brain damage in retired NFL players. Researchers performed in-depth neurological examinations of 45 retired NFL players, ranging in age from 30-to 60-years old. The analysis included state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI),...

2014-06-26 20:21:32

Utecht to Help Raise Awareness About Sports Concussion and Need for Research MINNEAPOLIS, June 26, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the American Brain Foundation have named Ben Utecht, former NFL tight end and Super Bowl champion with the Indianapolis Colts, as their national spokesperson. Utecht's role includes raising awareness of sports concussion and the need to support research into cures for brain diseases such as concussion. Utecht,...

2014-06-25 20:22:11

Sequoia also re-certified as Advanced Primary Stroke Center by The Joint Commission REDWOOD CITY, Calif., June 25, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Dignity Health Sequoia Hospital has added cutting-edge technology to its Emergency Room team to combat stroke--a telemedicine robot designed to quickly diagnose patients with stroke symptoms. Sequoia is the first hospital on the Peninsula to offer this technology. The robot, called the RP-VITA(TM) and nicknamed "Rosie" after the robot on The Jetsons...

2014-06-25 12:41:00

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Study led by Cedars-Sinai researchers uses computer modeling software to calculate target and programming details Although deep brain stimulation can be an effective therapy for dystonia – a potentially crippling movement disorder – the treatment isn't always effective, or benefits may not be immediate. Precise placement of DBS electrodes is one of several factors that can affect results, but few studies have attempted to identify the "sweet spot," where...

2014-06-25 10:21:35

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory There are new clues about malfunctions in brain cells that contribute to intellectual disability and possibly other developmental brain disorders. Professor Linda Van Aelst of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has been scrutinizing how the normal version of a protein called OPHN1 helps enable excitatory nerve transmission in the brain, particularly at nerve-cell docking ports containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Her team's new work, published June 24 in...

2014-06-19 14:28:14

American Academy of Neurology A new study suggests that people with muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies may benefit more from group doctor visits than individual appointments. The study is published in the June 18, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "In this age when the demand for neurologists is rising faster than the supply and health care costs continue to rise, it's important to look for finding solutions that are...

2014-06-19 09:39:33

University of Michigan Health System Persistence pays off with new mouse model of primary dystonia Twist and hold your neck to the left. Now down, and over to the right, until it hurts. Now imagine your neck – or arms or legs – randomly doing that on their own, without you controlling it. That's a taste of what children and adults with a neurological condition called dystonia live with every day – uncontrollable twisting and stiffening of neck and limb muscles. The mystery...

2014-06-16 12:29:07

Sunrise-to-Sunset Event Raises Awareness and Funds to Fuel the Alzheimer's Association® CHICAGO, June 16, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- On June 21, 2014, The Longest Day(®) participants across the globe will join with the Alzheimer's Association(®) to honor those living with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers. The Longest Day is a sunrise-to-sunset challenge to raise awareness and funds to fuel the care, support and research programs of the Alzheimer's Association. Held on the...

2014-06-12 23:02:20

Fungal Protein Found to Cross Blood-brain Barrier (PRWEB) June 12, 2014 In a remarkable series of experiments on a fungus that causes cryptococcal meningitis, a deadly infection of the membranes that cover the spinal cord and brain, investigators at UC Davis have isolated a protein that appears to be responsible for the fungus’ ability to cross from the bloodstream into the brain. The discovery — published online June 3 in mBio, the open-access, peer-reviewed journal of the American...


Latest Neurology Reference Libraries

Stroke
2012-05-02 19:35:56

Stroke is a peer-reviewed medical journal published monthly by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins on behalf of the American Heart Association. As of May 2012, the current editor-in-chief is Marc Fisher (University of Massachusetts Medical School). Stroke covers research on cerebral circulation and related diseases, including clinical research on assessment of risk for stroke, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment, as well as rehabilitation. The audience base for Stroke includes neurologists,...

69_7b87211f9314eacab994d465558a3a1b
2011-01-24 12:56:26

Herpes zoster (or zoster), is known as shingles or zona and is a viral disease characterized by painful skin rash with blisters in a limited area on one side of the body. Initial infection causes chickenpox. Once chickenpox is over the virus remains in the body and can cause shingles. It can become latent in the nerve cell bodies and sometimes in the dorsal root, cranial nerve, or autonomic ganglion. Years after initial infection, another breakout can cause a painful rash. The rash usually...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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