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Study Explains Why Elderly Have Trouble Sleeping

Study Explains Why Elderly Have Trouble Sleeping

Bonnie Prescott, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center A group of neurons are found to function as a 'sleep switch' in the brain As people grow older, they often have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep, and tend to awaken too early...

Latest Neuron Stories

2014-08-21 12:29:58

World-class neuroscientist from Stanford University brings expertise in synapse diversity and neural processing to research team SEATTLE, Aug. 21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The Allen Institute for Brain Science welcomes renowned neuroscientist Stephen J Smith, Ph.D., as a Senior Investigator. At the Allen Institute, Smith will build on his years of expertise in studying the brain to better understand the mechanisms behind neural computation in the human cortex. "We are very fortunate to...

2014-08-20 23:02:42

The first truly affordable crowd-funded motion capture system is the talk of the industry as it not only creates new opportunities for smaller film studios and game developers, but offers a state-of-the-art research tool for sports and the medical field. Beijing, China (PRWEB) August 20, 2014 Following a successful launch at SIGGRAPH and the subsequent incredible reception from the professional community, Noitom is proud to announce that they sailed past their midway Kickstarter funding...

2014-08-18 16:28:15

WELLESLEY, Mass., Aug. 18, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new study by Barbara Beltz, the Allene Lummis Russell Professor of Neuroscience at Wellesley College, and Irene Soderhall of Uppsala University, Sweden, published in the August 11 issue of the journal Developmental Cell, demonstrates that the immune system can produce cells with stem cell properties, using crayfish as a model system. These cells can, in turn, create neurons in the adult animal. The flexibility of immune...

2014-08-08 11:28:28

Emory University Physicists have identified a mechanism that may help explain Zipf’s law – a unique pattern of behavior found in disparate systems, including complex biological ones. The journal Physical Review Letters is publishing their mathematical models, which demonstrate how Zipf’s law naturally arises when a sufficient number of units react to a hidden variable in a system. “We’ve discovered a method that produces Zipf’s law without fine-tuning and with very few...

2014-08-04 09:37:10

Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Neurons are the cells of our brain, spinal cord, and overall nervous system. They form complex networks to communicate with each other through electrical signals that are carried by chemicals. These chemicals bind to structures on the surface of neurons that are called neuroreceptors, opening or closing electrical pathways that allow transmission of the signal from neuron to neuron. One neuroreceptor, called 5HT3-R, is involved in conditions like...

2014-08-04 08:57:44

MPG Max Planck researchers show that two products of the gene DJ-1 can increase the survival of neurons Parkinson’s disease affects neurons in the Substantia nigra brain region – their mitochondrial activity ceases and the cells die. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics show that supplying D-lactate or glycolate, two products of the gene DJ-1, can stop and even counteract this process: Adding the substances to cultured HeLa cells and to...

2014-07-30 10:23:14

Salk Institute Salk scientists show that the little-known supportive cells are vital in cognitive function When you're expecting something—like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant—or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. These waves are called gamma oscillations and they reflect a symphony of cells—both excitatory and inhibitory—playing together in an orchestrated way. Though their role has been debated, gamma waves...

2014-07-28 12:57:00

Emory University An experimental anti-inflammatory drug can protect vulnerable neurons and reduce motor deficits in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have shown. The results were published Thursday, July 24 in the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease. The findings demonstrate that the drug, called XPro1595, can reach the brain at sufficient levels and have beneficial effects when administered by subcutaneous injection, like an...

2014-07-21 09:52:36

Washington University in St. Louis New research provides an intriguing glimpse into the processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain. These connections, or synapses, allow nerve cells to transmit and process information involved in thinking and moving the body. Reporting online in Neuron, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a group of proteins that program a common type of brain nerve cell to connect with another...

2014-07-16 12:42:09

University of North Carolina Health Care UNC researchers lay the groundwork for a new approach to brain cancer treatments and a better understanding of Parkinson's disease Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have discovered that the protein PARC/CUL9 helps neurons and brain cancer cells override the biochemical mechanisms that lead to cell death in most other cells. In neurons, long-term survival allows for proper brain function as we age. In brain cancer cells, though, long-term...


Latest Neuron Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.