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Latest Neuron Stories

2014-06-17 10:58:53

University of California - San Diego Some neurons turn to neighbors to help take out the trash It's broadly assumed that cells degrade and recycle their own old or damaged organelles, but researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Kennedy Krieger Institute have discovered that some neurons transfer unwanted mitochondria – the tiny power plants inside cells – to supporting glial cells called astrocytes...

2014-06-11 23:11:43

The article published in AIMS Neuroscience explains how cortical microcircuitry is conducive to column formation. The column is the information bit proposed in the Dimensional Systems Model as the basis for learning and memory. Greenville, SC (PRWEB) June 11, 2014 Clinical neuropsychologist Robert A. Moss, Ph.D., FACPN, FAACP, and cognitive psychologist Jarrod Moss, Ph.D., are the authors of an article on cortical columns in the explanation of gamma-band synchrony and NMDA receptors in...

fruit fly escape
2014-06-10 08:57:04

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The flight of a fruit fly, as determined by a recent study, is dependent upon whether or not the fly perceives a threat. Scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus have successfully discovered the brain processes engaged in standard flight and the more rapid escape flight. A quick-escape circuit in the fly's brain overrides the slower, more controlled behavior as a threat looms large over the...

2014-06-09 10:30:56

University at Buffalo New study finds that blockages in fruit fly brains quickly form and dissolve; it could help treat Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases Motorists in Los Angeles, San Francisco and other gridlocked cities could learn something from the fruit fly. Scientists have found that cellular blockages, the molecular equivalent to traffic jams, in nerve cells of the insect’s brain can form and dissolve in 30 seconds or less. The findings, presented in the journal...

bite your tongue
2014-06-05 05:07:34

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online We have all experienced it. While enjoying a delicious meal, the flavors and textures of food are delightful as we practice the mastication necessary for the beginning of the digestive process. Then, out of nowhere, our tongue fails to get out of the way of our teeth and we clamp down on the fleshy muscle, eliciting pain and, almost certainly, a few choice words. Thankfully this situation occurs with relative infrequency and, thanks...

2014-05-28 12:54:36

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Researchers identify neurons that determine whether an individual will be depressed or resilient We all deal with stress differently. For many of us, stress is a great motivator, spurring a renewed sense of vigor to solve life's problems. But for others, stress triggers depression. We become overwhelmed, paralyzed by hopelessness and defeat. Up to 20% of us will struggle with depression at some point in life, and researchers are actively working to...

2014-05-28 08:26:44

- Preclinical data demonstrates reduction of Alzheimer's brain deficits to lower toxic Amyloid-beta and restored synaptic loss - PLANTATION, Fla., May 28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Neurotrope, Inc. (OTCQB: NTRP) announced today the publication of positive human cell culture and mouse model data of Bryostatin 1 in two peer reviewed journals: PLOS One and the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. Neurotrope's lead drug candidate, Bryostatin 1, a potent activator of the...

2014-05-26 13:27:58

Canadian Association for Neuroscience Mechanism uncovered could also help preserve neuron function in Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury and other neurodegenerative conditions Research presented by Dr. Lynn Raymond, from the University of British Columbia, shows that blocking a specific class of glutamate receptors, called extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, can improve motor learning and coordination, and prevent cell death in animal models of Huntington disease. As Huntington...

2014-05-26 13:08:30

NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine Findings should help narrow the search for genetic contributions of autism and suggest new routes for therapy "Aha" moments are rare in medical research, scientists say. As rare, they add, as finding mice with Mohawk-like hairstyles. But both events happened in a lab at NYU Langone Medical Center, months after an international team of neuroscientists bred hundreds of mice with a suspect genetic mutation tied to...

Controlling Fruit Fly Movements With A Mind-Altering Device
2014-05-26 11:15:03

Alan McStravick for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online A joint collaboration between the Vienna University of Technology and US researchers, has resulted in the development of a unique and novel technique to control Drosophila melangogaster, perhaps better known as the fruit fly, via thermogenetic means. The control the researchers exert is ultimately able to be analyzed at the neural level within the brains of the insects. Much of the work was conducted at the Information Management...


Latest Neuron Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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