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2014-05-16 08:25:39

LA JOLLA, Calif., May 16, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Mice crippled by an autoimmune disease similar to multiple sclerosis (MS) regained the ability to walk and run after a team of researchers led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), University of Utah and University of California (UC), Irvine implanted human stem cells into their injured spinal cords. Remarkably, the mice recovered even after their bodies rejected the human stem cells. "When we implanted the...

New Cellular Study Indicates Schizophrenia Begins In The Womb
2014-05-14 10:13:48

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from a large team of American researchers has revealed evidence that schizophrenia may originate during fetal development in the womb. For the study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, researchers analyzed neurons grown in the laboratory from the skin cells of individuals with schizophrenia. The study team noted in its report that these neurons behaved strangely and a similar type of neuronal development in the...

2014-05-07 11:11:04

George Washington University (GW) researcher David Mendelowitz, Ph.D., was recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience for his research on how heart rate increases in response to alertness in the brain. Specifically, Mendelowitz looked at the interactions between neurons that fire upon increased attention and anxiety and neurons that control heart rate to discover the “why,” “how,” and “where to next” behind this phenomenon. “This study examines how changes in alertness...

Blood Of Younger Mice Reverses Aging In Older Mice
2014-05-05 04:53:50

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The concept of infusing young blood into a company, sports team or organization was never intended to be taken literally, but three new studies suggest that doing so could actually help to reverse the aging process. According to Meeri Kim of the Washington Post, adding the blood of young three month old mice into the circulatory systems of elderly 18 month old ones appeared to dramatically improve the muscles and brain of the...

Scientists Hunt Down Origin Of Huntington's Disease In The Brain
2014-04-29 17:24:09

Elaine Schmidt, University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences The gene mutation that causes Huntington's disease appears in every cell in the body, yet kills only two types of brain cells. Why? UCLA scientists used a unique approach to switch the gene off in individual brain regions and zero in on those that play a role in causing the disease in mice. Published in the April 28 online edition of Nature Medicine, the research sheds light on where Huntington's starts in the...

2014-04-25 10:11:04

Leaps orders of magnitude beyond existing tools -- NIH study Scientists have bioengineered, in neurons cultured from rats, an enhancement to a cutting edge technology that provides instant control over brain circuit activity with a flash of light. The research funded by the National Institutes of Health adds the same level of control over turning neurons off that, until now, had been limited to turning them on. "What had been working through a weak pump can now work through a highly...

2014-04-25 10:04:46

Much-needed tool for neuroscience emerges after years of work Nearly a decade ago, the era of optogenetics was ushered in with the development of channelrhodopsins, light-activated ion channels that can, with the flick of a switch, instantaneously turn on neurons in which they are genetically expressed. What has lagged behind, however, is the ability to use light to inactivate neurons with an equal level of reliability and efficiency. Now, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) scientists...

Genetic Legacy Of A Rare Brain Disorder Traced Back To The Ottoman Empire
2014-04-25 05:17:10

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Scientists have detected a previously unknown neurodegenerative disorder stemming from a single mutation in one lone individual who lived approximately 16 generations ago during the days of the Ottoman Empire in Turkey, according to two studies appearing in Thursday’s edition of the journal Cell.  [ 1 ] [ 2 ] Two international teams of researchers, each of which was performing DNA sequencing of thousands of Turkish children...

2014-04-18 14:18:55

Fruit flies are pretty predictable when it comes to scheduling their days, with peaks of activity at dawn and dusk and rest times in between. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports on April 17th have found that the clusters of brain cells responsible for each of those activity peaks—known as the morning and evening oscillators, respectively—don't work alone. For flies' internal clocks to follow the sun, cooperation is key. "Without proper synchronization,...

2014-04-18 09:59:31

Attack by own immune system may kill neurons in Parkinson's disease The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. The study was published April 16, 2014, in Nature Communications. "This is a new, and likely controversial,...


Latest Neuron Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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