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Latest Neuron Stories

bite your tongue
2014-06-05 05:07:34

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online We have all experienced it. While enjoying a delicious meal, the flavors and textures of food are delightful as we practice the mastication necessary for the beginning of the digestive process. Then, out of nowhere, our tongue fails to get out of the way of our teeth and we clamp down on the fleshy muscle, eliciting pain and, almost certainly, a few choice words. Thankfully this situation occurs with relative infrequency and, thanks...

2014-05-28 12:54:36

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Researchers identify neurons that determine whether an individual will be depressed or resilient We all deal with stress differently. For many of us, stress is a great motivator, spurring a renewed sense of vigor to solve life's problems. But for others, stress triggers depression. We become overwhelmed, paralyzed by hopelessness and defeat. Up to 20% of us will struggle with depression at some point in life, and researchers are actively working to...

2014-05-28 08:26:44

- Preclinical data demonstrates reduction of Alzheimer's brain deficits to lower toxic Amyloid-beta and restored synaptic loss - PLANTATION, Fla., May 28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Neurotrope, Inc. (OTCQB: NTRP) announced today the publication of positive human cell culture and mouse model data of Bryostatin 1 in two peer reviewed journals: PLOS One and the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. Neurotrope's lead drug candidate, Bryostatin 1, a potent activator of the...

2014-05-26 13:27:58

Canadian Association for Neuroscience Mechanism uncovered could also help preserve neuron function in Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury and other neurodegenerative conditions Research presented by Dr. Lynn Raymond, from the University of British Columbia, shows that blocking a specific class of glutamate receptors, called extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, can improve motor learning and coordination, and prevent cell death in animal models of Huntington disease. As Huntington...

2014-05-26 13:08:30

NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine Findings should help narrow the search for genetic contributions of autism and suggest new routes for therapy "Aha" moments are rare in medical research, scientists say. As rare, they add, as finding mice with Mohawk-like hairstyles. But both events happened in a lab at NYU Langone Medical Center, months after an international team of neuroscientists bred hundreds of mice with a suspect genetic mutation tied to...

Controlling Fruit Fly Movements With A Mind-Altering Device
2014-05-26 11:15:03

Alan McStravick for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online A joint collaboration between the Vienna University of Technology and US researchers, has resulted in the development of a unique and novel technique to control Drosophila melangogaster, perhaps better known as the fruit fly, via thermogenetic means. The control the researchers exert is ultimately able to be analyzed at the neural level within the brains of the insects. Much of the work was conducted at the Information Management...

Fruit Flies Take Time To Think Before Making Difficult Decisions
2014-05-23 06:58:38

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It is common knowledge that most humans think before they act. A new study, published in the journal Science, makes the case that this cognitive ability can also be found in the fruit fly, and it seems these tiny insects take longer to make more difficult decisions, just like humans do. In the study, researchers from the University of Oxford's Centre for Circuits and Behaviour asked fruit flies to distinguish between ever closer...

jellyfish ctenophore
2014-05-23 05:16:26

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from a massive international team of researchers has shown that there is more than one way to “make an animal,” which could completely reshape 200 years of zoological theory. The study focused on the genomic blueprints for 10 species of comb jellies, or ctenophores, and discovered that the simple animals developed complex organs, neurons, muscles and behaviors independently from sponges, previously thought to be the...

2014-05-22 10:32:28

University of Cambridge A new method of generating mature nerve cells from skin cells could greatly enhance understanding of neurodegenerative diseases, and could accelerate the development of new drugs and stem cell-based regenerative medicine. The nerve cells generated by this new method show the same functional characteristics as the mature cells found in the body, making them much better models for the study of age-related diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, and for the...

2014-05-22 08:31:13

--Research Includes Stem Cells, Imaging and Exercise for Cognition-- MIAMI, May 22, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The National Parkinson Foundation (NPF) announced today that it has funded four new grants in Parkinson's disease (PD) research. The four grants target key scientific questions about how Parkinson's develops and how to optimize treatment. "NPF is propelling the most potentially transformative research forward," said Joyce Oberdorf, NPF's President and CEO. "This...


Latest Neuron Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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