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Latest Neuron Stories

2014-04-25 10:04:46

Much-needed tool for neuroscience emerges after years of work Nearly a decade ago, the era of optogenetics was ushered in with the development of channelrhodopsins, light-activated ion channels that can, with the flick of a switch, instantaneously turn on neurons in which they are genetically expressed. What has lagged behind, however, is the ability to use light to inactivate neurons with an equal level of reliability and efficiency. Now, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) scientists...

Genetic Legacy Of A Rare Brain Disorder Traced Back To The Ottoman Empire
2014-04-25 05:17:10

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Scientists have detected a previously unknown neurodegenerative disorder stemming from a single mutation in one lone individual who lived approximately 16 generations ago during the days of the Ottoman Empire in Turkey, according to two studies appearing in Thursday’s edition of the journal Cell.  [ 1 ] [ 2 ] Two international teams of researchers, each of which was performing DNA sequencing of thousands of Turkish children...

2014-04-18 14:18:55

Fruit flies are pretty predictable when it comes to scheduling their days, with peaks of activity at dawn and dusk and rest times in between. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports on April 17th have found that the clusters of brain cells responsible for each of those activity peaks—known as the morning and evening oscillators, respectively—don't work alone. For flies' internal clocks to follow the sun, cooperation is key. "Without proper synchronization,...

2014-04-18 09:59:31

Attack by own immune system may kill neurons in Parkinson's disease The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. The study was published April 16, 2014, in Nature Communications. "This is a new, and likely controversial,...

Stem Cell Science Using Key Ingredient Found In Silly Putty
2014-04-14 04:22:24

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An ingredient found in Silly Putty could help scientists more efficiently turn human embryonic stem cells into fully functional specialized cells, according to research published online Sunday in the journal Nature Materials. In the study, researchers from the University of Michigan report how they were able to coax stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells by growing them on a soft, extremely fine carpet in which the...

2014-04-11 10:16:28

To accommodate a lifetime of scents and aromas, mammals have hundreds of genes that each produce a different odorant receptor. The complex and diverse olfactory system they build remains adaptable, but a new study in the journal Science shows that the system's flexibility, or plasticity, has its limits. Working in mice, Brown University scientists found that the fundamental neural wiring map between the nose and the brain becomes established in a critical period of early development and then...

2014-04-11 10:13:44

Stowers investigators reveal a developmental switch in targeting capacity of olfactory neurons The human nose expresses nearly 400 odorant receptors, which allow us to distinguish a large number of scents. In mice the number of odor receptors is closer to 1000. Each olfactory neuron displays only a single type of receptor and all neurons with the same receptors are connected to the same spot, a glomerulus, in the brain. This convergence, or wiring pattern, is often described as an...

2014-04-09 12:31:28

DUBLIN, April 9, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/kbp6dj/strategic) has announced the addition of the "Strategic Development of Neural Stem & Progenitor Cell Products - 2013 Update" [http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/kbp6dj/strategic ] report to their offering. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769 ) Neurogenesis is the process by which neurons are created. This process is most...

2014-04-07 16:23:02

Skin cells use new molecule to send touch information to the brain In a study published in the April 6 online edition of the journal Nature, a team of Columbia University Medical Center researchers led by Ellen Lumpkin, PhD, associate professor of somatosensory biology, solve an age-old mystery of touch: how cells just beneath the skin surface enable us to feel fine details and textures. Touch is the last frontier of sensory neuroscience. The cells and molecules that initiate...

2014-04-07 16:00:28

A study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has helped solve a long-standing mystery about the sense of touch. The "gentle touch" sensations that convey the stroke of a finger, the fine texture of something grasped and the light pressure of a breeze on the skin are brought to us by nerves that often terminate against special skin cells called Merkel cells. These skin cells' role in touch sensation has long been debated in the scientific community. The new study,...


Latest Neuron Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.