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2014-02-13 08:31:14

TACOMA, Wash., Feb. 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Noted neuroscientist Dr. Rodolfo Llinas and colleagues have published an article reporting that Revalesio's RNS60 improves synaptic transmission. Synapses connect nerve cells and allow communication through the release of neurotransmitters, which are essential for normal function of the nervous system and overall brain activity. In their work, Dr. Llinas and his coworkers used the squid giant synapse, a well-established model for...

Chronic Stress Can Lead To Mental Illness
2014-02-12 08:56:22

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Chronic stress generates long-term changes in the brain, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley. These changes may explain why people suffering from chronic stress are prone to mental problems such as anxiety and mood disorders. The findings, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, might lead to new therapies to reduce the risk of developing mental illness after stressful events. Robert Sanders...

2014-02-10 11:15:53

Optogenetics is a technique that allows scientists to control neurons' electrical activity with light by engineering them to express light-sensitive proteins. Within the past decade, it has become a very powerful tool for discovering the functions of different types of cells in the brain. Most of these light-sensitive proteins, known as opsins, respond to light in the blue-green range. Now, a team led by MIT has discovered an opsin that is sensitive to red light, which allows researchers...

2014-02-07 13:22:53

Team sees change in set point in neuromuscular synapses Scientists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have found a clue as to why muscles weaken with age. In a study published today in The Journal of Neuroscience, they report the first evidence that “set points” in the nervous system are not inalterably determined during development but instead can be reset with age. They observed a change in set point that resulted in...

2014-02-07 13:03:28

Science paper by IST Austria scientists reports first evidence for “microdomain” coupling at a mature central synapse and explores the implications for synaptic plasticity In research published in this week’s online edition of Science (DOI: 10.1126/science.1244811), postdoc Nicholas Vyleta and Professor Peter Jonas of the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) uncover the existence of loose coupling between calcium channels and release sensors of exocytosis at a...

2014-02-07 12:51:08

Study in human cells may improve ability to identify useful drug targets In most cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease, a toxin released by cells that normally nurture neurons in the brain and spinal cord can trigger loss of the nerve cells affected in the disease, Columbia researchers reported today in the online edition of the journal Neuron. The toxin is produced by star-shaped cells called astrocytes and kills nearby motor neurons. In ALS, the death...

2014-02-05 23:03:02

A study led by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital offers a new avenue for scientists to pursue in the quest for desperately needed treatments for ALS Memphis, Tenn. (PRWEB) February 05, 2014 St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists led a study showing that mutations in a gene responsible for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) disrupt the RNA transport system in nerve cells. The findings appear in the current issue of the scientific journal Neuron and offer a new focus for...

2014-02-04 23:02:40

A new study proves inactivity detrimentally changes the structure of brain cells impacting heart health. TrekDesk treadmill desk offers a potential preventative solution. Scottsdale, AZ (PRWEB) February 04, 2014 TrekDesk has reported over the years on numerous studies that have shown the positive impact of walking on cognition and overall physical/mental health however a new study available for review in the US National Library of Medicine sheds light on the potential health risks brought...

2014-02-03 10:45:07

Our brains have billions of neurons grouped into different regions. These regions often work alone, but sometimes must join forces. How do regions communicate selectively? Stanford researchers may have solved a riddle about the inner workings of the brain, which consists of billions of neurons, organized into many different regions, with each region primarily responsible for different tasks. The various regions of the brain often work independently, relying on the neurons inside that...

2014-01-29 13:07:05

A new study shows that, when properly manipulated, a population of support cells found in the brain called astrocytes could provide a new and promising approach to treat Parkinson's disease. These findings, which were made using an animal model of the disease, demonstrate that a single therapy could simultaneously repair the multiple types of neurological damage caused by Parkinson's, providing an overall benefit that has not been achieved in other approaches. "One of the central...


Latest Neuron Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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