Quantcast
Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 21:24 EDT

Latest Neuropeptides Stories

2012-06-13 10:05:12

The velvety voice of Elvis Presley still makes hearts flutter–and in a new study with people who have the rare genetic disorder Williams syndrome, one of the King's classics is among a group of songs that helped to cast light on part of the essence of being human: the mystery of emotion and human interaction. In a study led by Julie R. Korenberg, Ph.D., M.D., University of Utah/USTAR professor, Circuits of the Brain and pediatrics, people with and without Williams syndrome (WS)...

Appetite Control With New Brain Receptor
2012-06-08 06:08:39

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com Losing weight and eating healthier have gone hand-in-hand for some time. Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) recently discovered how to help people in their goals for weight loss; a brain receptor that was found to have abilities to help regulate appetite. The study, published in the online edition of Cell, could help create new drugs focused on combating obesity. "We've identified a receptor that is intimately involved in...

2012-05-21 09:49:32

Preliminary results from an ongoing, large-scale study by Yale School of Medicine researchers shows that oxytocin – a naturally occurring substance produced in the brain and throughout the body– increased brain function in regions that are known to process social information in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A Yale Child Study Center research team that includes postdoctoral fellow Ilanit Gordon and Kevin Pelphrey, the Harris Associate Professor...

Ghrelin Can Cause Some People To Reward Themselves With Even More Food
2012-05-07 12:21:05

Ever notice how celebration and overeating often go hand-in hand? Americans celebrate holidays with formidable feasts and punctuate  promotions and other happy news with plenty to eat; The proverbial fatted calf, if you will. Now, research shows our minds could be hard-wired to chemically reward ourselves with delicious food, no matter how full we feel. An Italian team of researchers conducted the very small study on what is called “hedonic hunger.” According to MSN,...

2012-05-03 13:58:51

New study finds possible link between the hormone ghrelin and hedonic eating When eating is motivated by pleasure, rather than hunger, endogenous rewarding chemical signals are activated which can lead to overeating, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). The phenomenon ultimately affects body mass and may be a factor in the continuing rise of obesity. "'Hedonic hunger' refers to the...

2012-04-18 09:18:24

What makes some people give blood and bake casseroles for their neighbors, while others mutter about taxes from behind closed blinds? A new paper published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science finds that part of the answer–but not all–may be in their genes. The hormones oxytocin and vasopressin are thought to affect how people behave toward each other. For example, lab tests have found that people play nicer in economic games after...

Have Researchers Discovered The Niceness Gene?
2012-04-11 06:58:00

A person's DNA may play a key role in whether or not they are nice, kind and generous, claim the authors of a new study published in the journal Psychological Science. The research, which was led by University at Buffalo psychologist Michel Poulin, focuses on two hormones -- oxytocin and vasopressin -- which can "inspire feelings of love and generosity when they flood our brains," according to Life's Little Mysteries Staff Writer Natalie Wolchover. These hormones attach to different...

2012-04-10 12:54:11

Study finds peoples' relative niceness may reside in their genes It turns out that the milk of human kindness is evoked by something besides mom's good example. Research by psychologists at the University at Buffalo and the University of California, Irvine, has found that at least part of the reason some people are kind and generous is because their genes nudge them toward it. Michel Poulin, PhD, assistant professor of psychology at UB, is the principal author of the study "The...

Spurned In Love, Study Finds Fruit Flies Turn To Alcohol
2012-03-16 07:48:23

[ Watch the Video ] A male, his affections spurned by a female that he's attracted to, is driven to excessive alcohol consumption. The story may be familiar, but in this case, the lead characters aren't humans -- they're fruit flies. Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), have discovered that like their Homo sapiens counterparts, male members of the species Drosophila melanogaster tend to, for lack of a better term, "get drunk" after being rejected by...

2012-03-08 06:30:00

Trial conducted through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement QUÉBEC CITY, March 8, 2012 /PRNewswire/ - Aeterna Zentaris Inc. (NASDAQ: AEZS) (TSX: AEZ) (the "Company") today announced that the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, in Houston, Texas, has initiated a Phase 2A trial assessing the safety and efficacy of repeated doses of the Company's ghrelin agonist, AEZS-130 (macimorelin), in patients with cancer cachexia. The study is...


Latest Neuropeptides Reference Libraries

69_25ca82414f9e3d4dc58f4e0304b9dfb5
2011-04-28 17:02:45

Labor Induction is a process of giving an artificial start to birth with medical intervention or other methods. When an induction is not performed for emergency or other medical reasons, the method is considered an elective process. The decision to induce labor has increased in recent years due to its convenience or because it easily accommodates busy schedules. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, however, say that labor should only be induced when it is more risky...

More Articles (1 articles) »