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Latest Neuroplasticity Stories

2009-12-28 16:43:06

The early stages of Alzheimer's disease are thought to occur at the synapse, since synapse loss is associated with memory dysfunction. Evidence suggests that amyloid beta (AÃŽ²) plays an important role in early synaptic failure, but little has been understood about AÃŽ²'s effect on the plasticity of dendritic spines. These spines are short outgrowths of dendrites (extensions of neurons) that relay electrical impulses in the brain. A single neuron's dendrite...

2009-12-09 19:44:52

Cells release nourishing growth factor in key area Nerve cells transplanted into brain-damaged rats helped them to fully recover their ability to learn and remember, probably by promoting nurturing, protective growth factors, according to a new study. Building on previous investigation of transplants in the nervous system, this critical study confirms that cell transplants can help the brain to heal itself. Ultimately, it may lead to new therapies to help dementia patients. More generally,...

2009-12-09 07:00:00

BERKELEY, Calif., Dec. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- NeuroFocus, the world's leading neuromarketing company, announced that it has added two more members to its Advisory Board. The Advisory Board is comprised of globally recognized experts in neuroscience and business and provides NeuroFocus and its clients, many of whom rank among the Fortune 100 companies, with top-tier consultative resources. Dr. Hans-Jochen Heinze Dr. Heinze is a Director of the Leibniz Institute of Neurobiology Magdeburg,...

2009-11-25 15:01:41

You wouldn't want a car with no brakes. It turns out that the developing brain needs them, too. Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a set of molecular brakes that stabilize the developing brain's circuitry. Moreover, experimentally removing those brakes in mice enhanced the animals' performance in a test of visual learning, suggesting a long-term path to therapeutic application. In a study to be published Nov. 25 in Neuron, Carla Shatz, PhD, professor of...

2009-11-19 19:41:09

UCSF scientists studying nerve cells in fruit flies have uncovered a new function for a gene whose human equivalent may play a critical role in schizophrenia. Scientists have known that the mutated form of the human gene "“ one of three consistently associated with schizophrenia "“ mildly disrupts the transmission of chemical signals between nerve cells in the brain. The new study focuses on genes involved in "adaptive plasticity," the capacity of nerve cells to compensate for a...

2009-11-17 14:49:51

MU occupational therapy professor says recovery from brain injuries can last a lifetime Until recently, scientists believed that, following a stroke, a patient had about six months to regain any lost function. After that, patients would be forced to compensate for the lost function by focusing on their remaining abilities. Although this belief has been refuted, a University of Missouri occupational therapy professor believes that the current health system is still not giving patients enough...

2009-10-26 21:36:47

Regularly playing a musical instrument changes the anatomy and function of the brain and may be used in therapy to improve cognitive skills. There is growing evidence that musicians have structurally and functionally different brains compared with non-musicians. In particular, the areas of the brain used to process music are larger or more active in musicians. Even just starting to learn a musical instrument can change the neurophysiology of the brain. Lutz Jäncke, a member of Faculty of...

2009-10-26 10:18:39

A research collaboration led by biologists and neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania has found a molecular pathway in the brain that is the cause of cognitive impairment due to sleep deprivation. Just as important, the team believes that the cognitive deficits caused by sleep deprivation, such as an inability to focus, learn or memorize, may be reversible by reducing the concentration of a specific enzyme that builds up in the hippocampus of the brain. It is known that sleep...

2009-10-21 12:34:27

Research into specific cells and circuitry affected by addiction may help guard against relapse New research using animal models is enabling a deeper understanding of the neurobiology of compulsive drug addiction in humans "” knowledge that may lead to more effective treatment options to weaken the powerful cravings that cause people to relapse. The findings were released today at Neuroscience 2009, the Society for Neuroscience's annual meeting and the world's largest source of emerging...

2009-10-21 08:00:00

BELGRADE, SERBIA, Oct. 21 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ - Hard to Treat Diseases, Inc. (HTDS:PK), http://www.htdsmedical.com announced that researchers in its Slavica BioChem division have reported new positive results of experiments in which the potential beneficial effects of Hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) after traumatic brain injury have been explored. In the previous press release (reported at July 27, 2009) they revealed that repetitive HBO treatments, which started 1 hour after traumatic brain...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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