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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest New England Journal of Medicine Stories

2014-01-16 14:04:47

An endotracheal extubation training video produced by Rafael Ortega, MD, the vice-chair of academic affairs for the department of anesthesiology at Boston Medical Center (BMC) and professor of anesthesiology at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), and his colleagues is featured in this week's New England Journal of Medicine. The training video, which is the seventh BMC-produced video to appear in the NEJM's Videos in Clinical Medicine section, provides best practices for physicians...

2013-11-29 13:01:15

New England Journal of Medicine perspective highlights effects of education, prevention It's rare to hear good news about dementia. But that's what a New England Journal of Medicine Perspective article reports. The article discusses several recent studies that show how age-adjusted rates in aging populations have declined for people born later in the last century, particularly in those older people most likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The Perspective also describes what...

2013-10-31 11:21:51

"Treatment as prevention" – early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-infected individuals with uninfected sexual partners to prevent viral transmission – appears to make economic sense, along with meeting its clinical goals of helping infected patients stay healthy and reducing transmission. A model-based analysis of data from an important clinical trial projected that early ART for such patients in both South Africa and India would be very cost-effective over the lifetime...

2013-10-10 11:41:02

University of Michigan Health System study shows wide variation in surgeons' skills Video ratings data of surgeons' operating skills successfully predicted whether patients would suffer complications after they leave the operating room, according to a University of Michigan Health System study. The study assessed the relationship between the technical skill of 20 bariatric surgeons and post-surgery complications in 10,343 patients undergoing common, but complex laparoscopic gastric...

2013-09-19 13:24:10

GI Society leaders respond to the latest scientific evidence A study published in the Sept. 19 New England Journal of Medicine provides some of the clearest evidence to date that colonoscopy has advantages over sigmoidoscopy for the prevention of colorectal cancer. Researchers followed 88,902 study participants for 22 years and found that 1,815 developed colorectal cancer. Investigators estimated that 40 percent of those cancers could have been prevented if all of the patients in the...

2013-09-19 10:33:31

More comprehensive exam reduces risk throughout entire colon A study in the Sept. 19 New England Journal of Medicine finds that colonoscopy appears to reduce the risk of developing or dying from colorectal cancer more powerfully than does sigmoidoscopy, a similar procedure that examines only a portion of the colon. The investigation, which analyzes data from two long-term studies, also identifies molecular features that may help explain tumors that are diagnosed despite an individual's...

2013-09-12 13:29:25

As debate over the national debt and the federal budget deficit begins to heat up again, an analysis of national polls conducted in 2013 shows that, compared with recent government reports prepared by experts, the public has different views about the need to reduce future Medicare spending to deal with the federal budget deficit. Many experts believe that future Medicare spending will have to be reduced in order to lower the federal budget deficit [1] but polls show little support (10% to...

2013-08-08 09:26:53

University of Washington-Group Health study in New England Journal of Medicine A joint Group Health–University of Washington (UW) study in the New England Journal of Medicine has found that higher blood sugar levels are associated with higher dementia risk, even among people who do not have diabetes. Blood sugar levels averaged over a five-year period were associated with rising risks for developing dementia, in this report about more than 2,000 Group Health patients...

2013-06-07 13:05:04

Uterine leiomyomata, or fibroids, are benign tumors that nevertheless affect the health of millions of women. They may cause, for instance, pain, bleeding and infertility. Fibroids are also the most common reason for a hysterectomy; for example, some 8,000 hysterectomies are made in Finland each year. Scientists at the Academy of Finland's Centre of Excellence in Cancer Genetics Research have identified the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of common leiomyomata. The results of...

2013-05-01 08:23:08

Barilla Launches Nutritional & Environmental Food Model for Mediterranean Diet Month BANNOCKBURN, Ill., May 1, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Eat like an Italian, and you might just improve your health. Italian cuisine is part of the Mediterranean style of eating, which has sparked attention recently following a New England Journal of Medicine study[1] published this spring that found the Mediterranean diet may lower heart disease among high risk individuals. Americans can easily adopt...