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Latest New England Journal Stories

2013-11-27 09:59:05

In the United States, African Americans have approximately twice the risk of end-stage renal disease compared to white Americans, despite a similar prevalence in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease. A large study co-authored by George Washington University (GW) researcher Dominic Raj, M.D., identifies factors that mediate differences in the progression of chronic kidney disease between black patients and white patients, as well as among black patients, in order to reduce the excess...

2013-11-19 12:23:40

Rhode Island Hospital researchers play lead roles in study; will present findings at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association According to the findings from a national research trial, people who suffer from a narrowing of the arteries that lead to the kidneys, or renal artery stenosis, do not experience better outcomes when renal stenting is used. Instead, a comprehensive regimen of drug and medical therapies works just as well. The national study, which was led by Rhode Island...

2013-11-14 11:32:11

Adult patients with a type of cancer known as Burkitt lymphoma had excellent long-term survival rates—upwards of 90 percent—following treatment with low-intensity chemotherapy regimens, according to a new clinical trial finding. Standard treatment for Burkitt lymphoma involves high-dose chemotherapy, which has a high rate of toxicity, including death, and cures only 60 percent of adult patients. This trial was conducted by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the...

2013-10-31 16:28:54

Lowering the cost of health care requires lowering the cost of medical education The costs of medical education must be reduced as part of efforts to reign in health care costs more generally, according to a Perspective published online this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The currently high costs of medical education – which at some schools rise above $60,000 per year – are sustainable only if physician salaries remain high, which the authors, led by a physician from the...

2013-10-31 11:23:42

Ethical, care-improvement rationales cited Physicians' disclosure of errors has been studied more in the past decade than ever before, spurring rationales and guidelines for acknowledging one's own mistakes with patients. Relatively little, though, has spoken to how physicians should broach mistakes made by colleagues. "What do I do when it's somebody else's error and I have to decide whether to say anything to the patient?" It's the question Thomas Gallagher has fielded most often...

2013-10-31 11:21:51

"Treatment as prevention" – early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-infected individuals with uninfected sexual partners to prevent viral transmission – appears to make economic sense, along with meeting its clinical goals of helping infected patients stay healthy and reducing transmission. A model-based analysis of data from an important clinical trial projected that early ART for such patients in both South Africa and India would be very cost-effective over the lifetime...

2013-10-31 11:19:00

Remissions last longer, but survival not affected, except in highest risk patients Performing early stem cell transplants in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma does not improve overall survival in high-risk patients, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. But early transplantation does appear to be beneficial among a small group of patients who are at the very highest risk, the study found. Lead author is Patrick Stiff, MD, director of...

2013-10-25 10:30:00

A year ago this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention activated its Emergency Operations Center as part of the response to the tragic outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to three contaminated lots of preservative-free methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) produced by the New England Compounding Center (NECC). As of October 23, 2013, there have been 751 cases of fungal meningitis and other infections associated with this outbreak; 64 of these patients have died. Since July 2013,...

2013-10-10 11:41:02

University of Michigan Health System study shows wide variation in surgeons' skills Video ratings data of surgeons' operating skills successfully predicted whether patients would suffer complications after they leave the operating room, according to a University of Michigan Health System study. The study assessed the relationship between the technical skill of 20 bariatric surgeons and post-surgery complications in 10,343 patients undergoing common, but complex laparoscopic gastric...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.