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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 17:20 EDT

Latest New England Journal Stories

2013-07-11 13:05:23

Children who receive a vaccine to prevent blood and ear infections, appear to be reducing the spread of pneumonia to the rest of the population, especially their grandparents and other older adults. Results of a new Vanderbilt study, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and published in the July 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine show infant vaccination against pneumococcal bacteria since 2000 has reduced pneumonia hospitalization by more than 10...

2013-07-03 23:22:15

Automated Security Alert’s Medical Alarms Can Add Years to Life at Home Pittsburgh, PA (PRWEB) July 03, 2013 “According to the New England Journal of Medicine people with a medical alarm live independently for six more years than those without,” said Jason Seyler, Automated Security Alert's Director of Life Safety. “Doctors and other medical professionals recommend medical alert systems for senior citizens living alone. There is a direct correlation between having a medical...

2013-06-27 11:55:56

Phase 3 clinical trial in China, designed in partnership with UC San Francisco, could change standard of care in US Results of a Phase III clinical trial showed that a simple drug regimen of two anti-clotting drugs — clopidogrel and aspirin — lowered the risk of stroke by almost one-third, compared to the standard therapy of aspirin alone, when given to patients who had minor or transient stroke symptoms to prevent subsequent attacks. Described this week in the New England...

2013-06-21 12:49:39

One of the largest clinical trials done in infants with congenital (present at birth) heart diseases, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, shows that the increasingly common practice of using the drug clopidogrel (Plavix®) to reduce shunt-related blood flow issues is not effective in the dose studied. “Once again, pediatric-specific research shows that newborns and infants are not little adults," said David Wessel, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Children's National Medical...

2013-06-20 23:34:37

Latest results of Phase 2 study confirm high rate of response, remission In a major international study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the targeted therapy ibrutinib continues to show remarkable promise for the treatment of relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). The most recent interim findings of the 18-center Phase 2 study were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Previous interim findings were presented in...

2013-06-20 23:30:02

Two clinical studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine with an accompanying editorial suggest that the novel agent ibrutinib shows real potential as a safe, effective, targeted treatment for adults with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and for patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Both studies, co-led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center — Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC —...

2013-06-20 23:27:04

Although as many as 25 percent of patients undergoing surgery suffer from sleep apnea, few hospitals have policies to help manage the risks of this condition during surgery, and there is little evidence to help guide anesthesiologists and surgeons caring for these patients. In a new editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine, Stavros Memtsoudis, M.D., Ph.D., director of Critical Care Services at Hospital for Special Surgery, New York City, calls for a new research initiative to identify...

2013-06-18 10:30:01

Researchers believe the 'undruggable' may be druggable Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers have identified in the most aggressive forms of cancer a gene known to regulate embryonic stem cell self-renewal, beginning a creative search for a drug that can block its activity. The gene, SALL4, gives stem cells their ability to continue dividing as stem cells rather than becoming mature cells. Typically, cells only express SALL4 during embryonic development, but the gene is...

2013-06-07 13:05:04

Uterine leiomyomata, or fibroids, are benign tumors that nevertheless affect the health of millions of women. They may cause, for instance, pain, bleeding and infertility. Fibroids are also the most common reason for a hysterectomy; for example, some 8,000 hysterectomies are made in Finland each year. Scientists at the Academy of Finland's Centre of Excellence in Cancer Genetics Research have identified the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of common leiomyomata. The results of...

2013-06-03 12:26:51

Researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center report that a new drug in preliminary tests has shown promising results with very manageable side effects for treating patients with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The results were presented at the 2013 meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology today in Chicago by Dr. Antoni Ribas, professor of medicine in the UCLA division of hematology-oncology, who led the research. Following Ribas' presentation, the...