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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest New England Journal Stories

2013-05-22 10:19:08

A paper recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine and co-written by physicians and scientists at the University of Colorado School of Medicine finds that an important genetic risk factor for pulmonary fibrosis can be used to identify individuals at risk for this deadly lung disease. Researchers looked at a fairly common variant of the gene for mucin-5B, a protein that is a component of the mucous produced by the bronchial tubes. While this variant of the MUC5B gene is...

2013-05-02 17:38:07

New findings from the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment show that Medicaid coverage had no detectable effect on the prevalence of diabetes, high cholesterol, or high blood pressure, but substantially reduced depression, nearly eliminated catastrophic out-of-pocket expenditures, and increased the diagnosis of diabetes and the use of diabetes medication among low-income adults. The Oregon Health Insurance Experiment is the first use of a randomized controlled study design to evaluate the...

2013-05-01 08:23:08

Barilla Launches Nutritional & Environmental Food Model for Mediterranean Diet Month BANNOCKBURN, Ill., May 1, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Eat like an Italian, and you might just improve your health. Italian cuisine is part of the Mediterranean style of eating, which has sparked attention recently following a New England Journal of Medicine study[1] published this spring that found the Mediterranean diet may lower heart disease among high risk individuals. Americans can easily adopt...

2013-04-04 12:16:56

Despite menopause-like side effects, continuous hormone treatment is superior to intermittent therapy A study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine recommends a dramatic shift in the way doctors treat metastatic prostate cancer. "These results have changed the way I treat patients," said Ian M. Thompson Jr., M.D., director of the Cancer Therapy & Research Center at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and senior author on the international...

2013-04-04 12:14:22

Vermont's aggressive health care reform initiatives can serve as a roadmap for other states, according to a Master of Public Health candidate at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The paper, "Lessons from Vermont's Health Care Reform," will appear tomorrow in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study's author, Laura Grubb, M.D., of The University of Texas School of Public Health, part of UTHealth, wrote that Vermont is well ahead of most other states...

2013-03-28 13:28:05

Trend is especially prevalent in Florida and Texas Effective health screening and preventive care is known to reduce health care costs and improve health outcomes, yet new research from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) shows that restrictive Medicaid policies are associated with patients delaying needed medical care due to cost. States and counties with the most restrictive Medicaid eligibility criteria (where individuals must be far below the federal poverty level to qualify for...

2013-03-28 10:47:28

Interaction between gene and environment predicts disease onset About 90 percent of children with two copies of a common genetic variation and who wheezed when they caught a cold early in life went on to develop asthma by age 6, according to a study to be published March 28 by the New England Journal of Medicine. These children, all from families with a history of asthma or allergies, were nearly four times as likely to develop the disease as those who lacked the genetic variation and...

2013-03-22 15:22:38

Population at high risk for obesity-related mortality able to make healthy lifestyle changes Through a program that teaches simple nutrition messages and involves both counseling and regular exercise classes, people with serious mental illness can make healthy behavioral changes and achieve significant weight loss, according to new Johns Hopkins research. These weight loss amounts were similar to those in other successful programs studied with subjects in the general population –...

2013-03-21 10:12:50

Long-term follow-up of a phase II study from KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme and Oxford University researchers in Kenya shows that the efficacy of a malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S, wanes over time and varies with exposure to the malaria parasite. The findings will help to inform which populations are likely to benefit most from the vaccine candidate. They also have important implications for the design of future clinical trials of this and other vaccine candidates and highlight...

2013-03-14 17:23:00

When someone has a stroke, time equals brain. The longer a stroke is left untreated, the more brain tissue is lost. Since the only proven treatment – a clot-busting drug – works in less than half of patients, stroke physicians had high hopes for a mechanical device that could travel through the blocked blood vessel to retrieve or break up the clot, restoring blood flow to the brain. But in a recently completed multi-site trial in which UCLA served as the clinical coordinating...