Quantcast
Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Latest New England Journal Stories

2013-03-11 15:08:13

Phase 3 findings published in NEJM provide answers about treatment with darbepoetin alfa Researchers from Cleveland Clinic and Sweden-based Sahlgrenska University Hospital have found that a commonly used drug to treat anemia in heart failure patients —darbepoetin alfa — does not improve patients' health, nor does it reduce their risk of death from heart failure. Results of the international study were presented at the American College of Cardiology's annual meeting in San...

2013-03-07 23:56:50

Different priorities from physicians, patients weaken opportunities for genuine reform The wide consensus that health care spending poses a threat to the nation's fiscal solvency has led to the championing of "value" as a goal of health care reform efforts. But the divergence of opinions between patients and physicians on the meaning of value presents an obstacle to progress in achieving genuine reform, says Lisa Rosenbaum, MD, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar and...

2013-03-07 23:55:16

As baby-boomers age and the number of people with serious chronic illnesses continues to rise, the demand for experts in palliative medicine is sure to outstrip the supply, according Timothy E. Quill, M.D., professor of Medicine, Psychiatry and Medical Humanities in the Center for Ethics, Humanities and Palliative Care at the University of Rochester Medical Center. In a perspective published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, Quill, who serves as president of the American Academy...

2013-02-07 12:24:59

Researchers have discovered a gene associated with a form of cholesterol that increases the risk of developing aortic stenosis, the most common form of heart valve disease, by more than half. This international study, involving the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), is the first of its kind to uncover a genetic link with aortic valve disease — a condition that affects more than 5 million people in North America. The results of the study, published in...

2013-02-07 12:22:59

Study described in the New England Journal of Medicine is the first to show cause-and-effect relationship between a gene variant and calcium deposits on the aortic valve Researchers have found a genetic variant that doubles the likelihood that people will have calcium deposits on their aortic valve. Such calcification, if it becomes severe, can cause narrowing or a blockage of the aortic valve, a condition called aortic stenosis. The study is the first large-scale, genome-wide association...

2013-02-07 12:21:01

An international collaboration of researchers from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), Tunisia and France has demonstrated a high cure rate and remarkably few side effects in treating patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) with an investigational antibiotic cream. CL is a parasitic disease that causes disfiguring lesions, with 350 million people at risk worldwide and 1.5 million new cases annually, including U.S. military personnel serving abroad and the...

2013-01-23 10:49:40

Commentary sheds light on approval process for implantable body parts Technological advancements in medicine have allowed patients suffering from musculoskeletal conditions such as hip and knee pain to regain mobility and live relatively pain-free. But some "high risk" surgical devices that have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are not required to go through clinical trials, where a product is tested to determine its safety and effectiveness. "This could be...

2013-01-17 13:44:36

Teams using checklists were 74 percent less likely to miss key life-saving steps in care during emergency situations than those working from memory alone In an airplane crisis–an engine failure, a fire–pilots pull out a checklist to help with their decision-making. But in an operating room crisis–massive bleeding, a patient's heart stops–surgical teams don't. Given the complexity of judgment and circumstances, standard practice is for teams to use memory alone. In a...

2013-01-17 13:42:32

NIH researcher assists in study of Norwegian women Norwegian pregnant women who received a vaccine against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus showed no increased risk of pregnancy loss, while pregnant women who experienced influenza during pregnancy had an increased risk of miscarriages and still births, a study has found. The study suggests that influenza infection may increase the risk of fetal loss. Scientists at the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Norwegian Institute of Public...

2013-01-17 13:38:06

A 48-week course of antiretroviral medication taken in the early stages of HIV infection slows the damage to the immune system and delays the need for long term treatment, according to research published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. However, the delay was only marginally longer than the time already spent on treatment. The study, the largest clinical trial ever undertaken looking at treating people with recent HIV infection, also suggests that the treatment lowers the...