Quantcast

Latest New England Journal Stories

2013-01-23 10:49:40

Commentary sheds light on approval process for implantable body parts Technological advancements in medicine have allowed patients suffering from musculoskeletal conditions such as hip and knee pain to regain mobility and live relatively pain-free. But some "high risk" surgical devices that have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are not required to go through clinical trials, where a product is tested to determine its safety and effectiveness. "This could be...

2013-01-17 13:44:36

Teams using checklists were 74 percent less likely to miss key life-saving steps in care during emergency situations than those working from memory alone In an airplane crisis–an engine failure, a fire–pilots pull out a checklist to help with their decision-making. But in an operating room crisis–massive bleeding, a patient's heart stops–surgical teams don't. Given the complexity of judgment and circumstances, standard practice is for teams to use memory alone. In a...

2013-01-17 13:42:32

NIH researcher assists in study of Norwegian women Norwegian pregnant women who received a vaccine against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus showed no increased risk of pregnancy loss, while pregnant women who experienced influenza during pregnancy had an increased risk of miscarriages and still births, a study has found. The study suggests that influenza infection may increase the risk of fetal loss. Scientists at the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Norwegian Institute of Public...

2013-01-17 13:38:06

A 48-week course of antiretroviral medication taken in the early stages of HIV infection slows the damage to the immune system and delays the need for long term treatment, according to research published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. However, the delay was only marginally longer than the time already spent on treatment. The study, the largest clinical trial ever undertaken looking at treating people with recent HIV infection, also suggests that the treatment lowers the...

2012-12-06 11:16:07

As lawmakers on both sides of the political aisle look for ways to reduce federal spending in the coming weeks Medicaid may emerge as a prime target, according to a new analysis by Professor Sara Rosenbaum, JD, the Harold and Jane Hirsh Professor of Health Law and Policy at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS). The analysis, which appears online December 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine, indicates that severe cuts to the Medicaid program...

2012-11-29 15:01:16

Boston, MA — An analysis of newly released polls shows that most of those who voted for President Obama in the 2012 election favor implementing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and want the federal government to continue efforts to make sure most Americans have health insurance coverage. However, at the same time the President was re-elected, Republicans maintained a majority in the U.S. House of Representatives, and 30 of the nation's 50 states will have Republican governors. The...

2012-11-29 14:56:43

HOUSTON — A previously invincible mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been thwarted by an investigational drug in a phase I clinical trial reported in the current edition of The New England Journal of Medicine. All 12 patients in the trial with chronic phase CML and the T315I mutation had a complete hematologic response (absence of CML cells in the blood) after treatment with ponatinib. Eleven had a major reduction in CML cells in the bone marrow and nine achieved a...

2012-11-29 14:42:24

(Boston) — In a perspective article to appear in the Nov. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health (BUSM and BUSPH) report that health-care providers can play a critical role in helping to reduce and prevent intimate partner violence (IPV) by screening and referring patients to appropriate resources. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released a comprehensive report on the...

2012-11-23 10:52:09

Immune globulin replacement began decades ago as a treatment for patients who could not make their own protective antibodies, but has proven to have much broader benefits than originally expected. With new uses regularly being discovered for this limited and expensive resource, including as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease, now is the time to discover exactly how intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) treatments work, and to engineer a protein that can provide similar benefits,...

2012-11-09 10:55:32

Physicians at Boston Medical Center (BMC) have developed a training video for health care providers about how to effectively use capnography to monitor ventilation and carbon dioxide levels for patients under anesthesia or conscious sedation. This is the sixth video published in the New England Journal of Medicine's Videos in Clinical Medicine section produced by BMC. It highlights the importance of using capnography to increase patient safety. Capnography, which graphically monitors...


Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
Related