Quantcast

Latest New England Journal Stories

2012-11-05 15:03:03

A drug therapy shows promise for treating an inherited form of kidney disease called autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), Mayo Clinic researchers say. The medication, tolvaptan, slowed the pace of kidney cyst growth over the three years of the study. The phase three clinical trial results were being presented today at the American Society of Nephrology annual meeting and published online in the New England Journal of Medicine. The multicenter study found tolvaptan...

2012-11-01 10:15:34

Reforming Medicare payments based on large geographic regions may be too bluntly targeted to promote the best use of health care resources, a new analysis from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health suggests. The analysis will be published in the Nov. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "Much policy attention has been drawn to the large geographic variation in health care spending across regions, and for good reason — because regional variation...

2012-10-26 00:40:03

Findings from a nationwide study led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute suggest that patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer are frequently mistaken in their beliefs that chemotherapy can cure their disease. The study, published in the Oct. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, found that 69 percent of patients with advanced lung cancer and 81 percent of patients with advanced colorectal cancer did not understand that the chemotherapy they were receiving was...

2012-10-11 11:29:58

Voters who consider health care the top issue in their choice of candidate are more likely to side with Obama vs. Romney on the Affordable Care Act and Medicare A new analysis of 37 national opinion polls conducted by 17 survey organizations finds that health care is the second most important issue for likely voters in deciding their 2012 presidential vote. This is the highest that health care has been ranked as a presidential election issue since 1992. When likely voters were asked to...

2012-10-11 11:24:59

Fibulin-3 represents a sensitive and specific marker for the diagnosis of mesothelioma, offering a potential tool for early diagnosis, monitoring Researchers at NYU School of Medicine have discovered the protein product of a little-known gene may one day prove useful in identifying and monitoring the development of mesothelioma in early stages, when aggressive treatment can have an impact on the progression of disease and patient prognosis. "This gene produces a protein, fibulin-3, that...

2012-09-18 23:54:48

Bariatric surgery reduces the long-term risk of developing diabetes by over 80 % among people with obesity. The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has published the results of a study conducted at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. A study conducted by Professor Lars Sjöström, Professor Lena Carlsson and their team at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, has found that bariatric surgery is considerably more effective than...

2012-09-13 23:23:18

'There is more to life than death,' Hartzband and Groopman write In the medical world, where decisions invariably involve risk and uncertainty, two Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center physicians note that experts generally base their recommendations on the outcome of death, which is "readily determined, easily quantified, concrete." "There is more to life than death," Pamela Hartzband, MD, and Jerome Groopman, MD, write in the Sept. 12 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine....

2012-09-10 10:58:02

Study drives home importance of addressing unique needs in specific patient populations Although some studies have portrayed tight blood sugar control as a potential means of lowering infection rates in critically ill adults, a new study–led by principal investigator Michael Agus, MD, director of the Medicine Critical Care Program at Boston Children's Hospital–found no indication that the approach benefits pediatric patients undergoing heart surgery. The results of the Safe...

2012-09-06 12:48:22

Provocative NEJM essay calls for redoubling of efforts Each year, nearly 2 million people die from tuberculosis — a treatable disease that has been brought under control in the United States, but continues to ravage other parts of the world. This health inequity should prompt a complete rethinking of the way tuberculosis is fought on a global level, argue Salmaan Keshavjee, MD, PhD, and Paul Farmer, MD, PhD, from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH). Their argument appears in an essay...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
Related