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Latest New Zealand mud snail Stories

Researcher Finds 'Goldilocks' Effect In Snail Populations
2013-12-04 08:18:59

University of Iowa Finding may one day help control invasive species A University of Iowa researcher has discovered that a “Goldilocks” effect applies to the reproductive output of a tiny New Zealand snail—considered a troublesome species in many countries—that may one day help environmentalists control their spread. Known in the United States as the “New Zealand mud snail,” the freshwater snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) grows to a length of about one-quarter inch in...

Aquatic Invader That Can Survive Without Water
2012-08-22 10:01:19

Nowadays, an increasing number of rivers and lakes are being invaded by exotic snails, which come from remote regions, and even other continents. Such species represent a threat to native species, as they compete for food or space with them. This is the case of the mudsnail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum). This small aquatic snail is native to New Zealand, and has spread throughout rivers, lakes or streams in Europe, Australia, America and Asia. The invasion success of this mudsnail may be...

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2011-07-11 13:15:00

According to scientists, snails are able to survive intact after being eaten by birds. Researchers found that 15 percent of the snails eaten survived digestion and were found alive in the birds' droppings. The evidence suggests that bird predation could be a key factor into how snail populations spread. Japanese researchers from Tohoku University investigated whether invertebrates could also spread in this way. Previous research has shown that pond snails can survive being eaten by fish but...

2010-01-22 00:55:51

Living organisms have good reason for engaging in sexual, rather than asexual, reproduction according to Maurine Neiman, assistant professor of biology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and researcher in the Roy J. Carver Center for Genomics. In an article published in a recent issue of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, she and her colleagues, including John M. Logsdon Jr., associate professor of biology, examined the theory that sexual reproduction, while requiring...

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2009-07-23 11:35:00

 The coevolutionary struggle between a New Zealand snail and its worm parasite makes sex advantageous for the snail, whose females favor asexual reproduction in the absence of parasites, say Indiana University Bloomington and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology biologists in this week's Current Biology.The scientists' report represents direct experimental evidence for the "Red Queen Hypothesis" of sex, which suggests sexual reproduction allows host species to avoid infection by their...

2009-07-07 11:27:35

What's so great about sex? From an evolutionary perspective, the answer is not as obvious as one might think. An article published in the July issue of the American Naturalist suggests that sex may have evolved in part as a defense against parasites. Despite its central role in biology, sex is a bit of an evolutionary mystery. Reproducing without sex"”like microbes, some plants and even a few reptiles"”would seem like a better way to go. Every individual in an asexual...

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2008-08-16 18:15:00

Lake Michigan's ecosystem is being threatened by a quick producing, tiny snail. The invasive creature has scientists worrying about the lake's balance. The New Zealand mud snail joins a rapidly growing list of nonnative species moving into the Great Lakes, threatening to disrupt the food chain and change the local environment. The snails reproduce asexually and in large numbers, and have no natural predators in North America, said Kevin Cummings, a scientist who works for the Natural History...

2008-08-08 12:00:24

U.S. scientists say the New Zealand mud snail, long a problem in western states, has spread across four U.S. Great Lakes and is altering the lakes' ecology. Pennsylvania State University scientists said the tiny snails out-compete native snails and insects but aren't good fish food replacements for the native species. "These snails have an operculum, a door that closes the shell," said Associate Professor Edward Levri at the university's Altoona, Pa., campus. "They can be out of the water...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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