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Latest Nile crocodile Stories

Nile Crocodiles May Look Tough, But They Can Be Sensitive Too
2013-07-02 14:51:10

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Crocodiles may look tough, but they can also be very sensitive -- particularly when it comes to detecting touch, temperature, or chemicals in their watery environment. Previous research has shown that crocodilians, which includes alligators, gharials and caimans, detect a multitude of information through integumentary sensory organs (ISO) found in their skin and a new study recently published in the journal EvoDevo has revealed how...

Image 1 - Large Ancient Crocs Could Have Swallowed Humans Whole
2012-05-08 07:53:58

East African giant crocodiles that lived between two and four million years ago were large enough to swallow an entire human, according to a new study led by University of Iowa researchers. The fossil of one specimen measured 27 feet long, far larger than any known to date. Scientists first believed it may have been an ancestor of today´s Nile crocodile, but analysis shows otherwise, said lead author Christopher A. Brochu, a vertebrate paleontologist at UoI. “It´s the...

2011-12-20 12:38:28

The Nile crocodile is a species that was identified by ancient Egyptians. Genetic analysis done by a group of geneticists using samples taken from species throughout the animal's range and including DNA from mummified crocodile remains indicates that more than one species is known by this name. "This paper provides a remarkable surprise: the Nile crocodile is not a single species, as previously thought, but instead demonstrates two species - living side-by side - constitute what has been...

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2011-07-21 09:15:00

Rare find alters origins and distribution of Terminonaris; first home was Texas and North America "” not Europe By Margaret Allen, SMU Making its first appearance in Texas, a prehistoric crocodile thought to have originated in Europe now appears to have been a native of the Lone Star State. The switch in origins for the genus known as Terminonaris is based on the identification of a well-preserved, narrow fossil snout that was discovered along the shoreline of a lake near Dallas. The...

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2010-06-07 09:15:12

The mystery of how the world's largest living reptile - the estuarine crocodile - has come to occupy so many South Pacific islands separated by huge stretches of ocean despite being a poor swimmer has at last been solved by a group of Australian ecologists. Publishing their new study in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Animal Ecology, they say that like a surfer catching a wave, the crocodiles ride ocean currents to cross large areas of open sea. The estuarine crocodile (Crocodylus...

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2009-05-13 06:15:00

Environmentalists fear that a surge in demand for crocodile skins in Nigeria could threaten the reptiles with extinction. Indeed, business is booming at Ismail Dauda's crocodile tannery in Northern Nigeria. Dauda, 35, followed his father Maifata into the family business of tanning crocodile and python pelts when he was just 15.   The tannery, located in the old part of Nigeria's main northern city of Kano, "processes" up to 20,000 animals in a good month. "We have been tanning...

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2008-12-12 15:53:36

You'd think that if scientists were to discover a new species, it would be in some remote, uncharted tropical forest, not a laboratory in New York. But a team from the Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics at the American Museum of Natural History has done the unexpected. Looking at the genes of the African dwarf crocodile, researchers found that the group"”genetically speaking"”comprises three distinct species rather than one. This not only ends a long debate about the...

2008-09-17 16:51:18

By MIKE SWAIN; Science Editor WILDLIFE rangers light a huge bonfire piled with dead crocodiles to try to halt the spread of a disease that is threatening a whole colony. More than 150 crocs have died in three months in an epidemic that is puzzling scientists. It is feared the infection is spreading because healthy animals are eating the dead ones. So all the carcasses are being torched at Olifants Gorge in Kruger Park, South Africa. It is known they are dying of pansteatitis...


Latest Nile crocodile Reference Libraries

41_51afdc302b545272dda535f519fb3873
2007-01-23 15:40:11

The Saltwater or Estuarine Crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, is the largest of all existing reptiles. It is found in suitable habitat throughout Southeast Asia and northern Australasia. These are known as "˜salties' in the Northern territory of Australia. They generally spend the tropical wet season in freshwater swamps and rivers, moving downstream to estuaries in the dry season, and sometimes far out to sea. Adult male saltwater crocs typically grow to an average of 16 feet long and weigh...

0_c8cdc3ae6648360abb41db15e69dcab6
2007-01-23 15:35:29

The Nile Crocodile is one of the three species of crocodile found in Africa, and the second largest species of crocodile. Its range covers most of Africa south of the Sahara and the island of Madagascar. The preferred habitat of Nile crocodiles is along rivers, in freshwater marshes, or along lakes. In some cases they thrive in more brackish water, along estuaries of mangrove swamps. Like all crocodiles, they are quadrupeds with four short, splayed legs; long, powerful tails; a scaly hide...

41_471f74eb88c4baabbad3f5afb899b5da
2007-01-23 15:29:06

The American Crocodile, Crocodylus acutus, is one of 4 species of New World crocodile and the most widespread in range. It occurs from the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of southern Mexico through Central America and in South America as far as Peru and Venezuela. It also breeds in Cuba, Jamaica, and Hispania. There is also a remnant population in Florida. Their habitat consists largely of freshwater or brackish coastal habitats and mangrove swamps. The American Crocodile grows to a maximum...

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