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Latest Nina Kraus Stories

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2011-05-12 14:04:42

Researchers found that playing a musical instrument can help keep memories active and hearing working. A new study found that musical training helps the brain to be more adaptable to aging and make adjustments for any decline in the ability to remember or ability to separate speech from background noise. The research adds further weight to the benefits of musical training, which is also associated with greater learning ability in the classroom. "Lifelong musical training appears to confer...

2011-05-12 07:29:43

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Musical training may offset some unwanted effects of aging, according to a new study. Researchers found musicians excel in auditory memory and the ability to hear speech in noisy environments when compared to non-musicians. "Difficulty hearing speech in noise is among the most common complaints of older adults, but age-related hearing loss only partially accounts for this impediment that can lead to social isolation and depression," Nina Kraus, director of the Auditory...

2010-07-21 14:06:53

Scientific review of how music training primes nervous system and boosts learning Those ubiquitous wires connecting listeners to you-name-the-sounds from invisible MP3 players -- whether of Bach, Miles Davis or, more likely today, Lady Gaga -- only hint at music's effect on the soul throughout the ages. Now a data-driven review by Northwestern University researchers that will be published July 20 in Nature Reviews Neuroscience pulls together converging research from the scientific literature...

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2010-02-21 08:30:00

Music training enhances brainstem sensitivity to speech sounds At press briefing on Saturday, Feb. 20, at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting, a Northwestern University neuroscientist argued that music training has profound effects that shape the sensory system and should be a mainstay of K-12 education. "Playing an instrument may help youngsters better process speech in noisy classrooms and more accurately interpret the nuances of language that are conveyed...

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2009-11-17 09:28:06

Music appreciation could help children with language-based learning disabilities The Journal of Neuroscience reports this week that musicians are better than non-musicians at recognizing speech in noisy environments.  The finding from a study conducted by neurobiologists at Northwestern University in Chicago is the first biological evidence that musicians' have a perceptual advantage for "speech-in-noise." When tested against non-musicians, musicians demonstrated faster neural timing,...

2009-11-11 17:54:10

Good readers learn from repeating auditory signals, poor readers do not The vast majority of school-aged children can focus on the voice of a teacher amid the cacophony of the typical classroom thanks to a brain that automatically focuses on relevant, predictable and repeating auditory information, according to new research from Northwestern University. But for children with developmental dyslexia, the teacher's voice may get lost in the background noise of banging lockers, whispering...

2009-11-11 17:50:13

New research reveals that children with developmental dyslexia have a deficit in a brain mechanism involved in the perception of speech in a noisy environment. The study, published by Cell Press in the November 12 issue of the journal Neuron, provides the first direct evidence that the human auditory brainstem exhibits remarkable moment-to-moment plasticity and undergoes a fine tuning that is strongly associated with noise exclusion. Most people have little trouble carrying on a conversation...

2009-08-21 00:11:40

U.S. researchers say trained musicians are better able to discern speech in noisy environments. The study, published in Ear and Hearing, supports the potential therapeutic and rehabilitation uses of musical training for those with hearing and communication disorders. The study points to a highly pragmatic side of music's magic, Nina Kraus, director of the lab at Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill., says in a statement. The researchers asked 31 study participants with normal hearing and a...

2009-08-17 15:56:46

 Anyone with an MP3 device -- just about every man, woman and child on the planet today, it seems -- has a notion of the majesty of music, of the primal place it holds in the human imagination.But musical training should not be seen simply as stuff of the soul -- a frill that has to go when school budgets dry up, according to a new Northwestern University study.The study shows that musicians -- trained to hear sounds embedded in a rich network of melodies and harmonies -- are primed to...

2009-07-13 17:15:17

 A child's brain has to work overtime in a noisy classroom to do its typical but very important job of distinguishing sounds whose subtle differences are key to success with language and reading.But that simply is too much to ask of the nervous system of a subset of poor readers whose hearing is fine, but whose brains have trouble differentiating the "ba," "da" and "ga" sounds in a noisy environment, according to a new Northwestern University study."The \'b,\' \'d\' and \'g\' consonants...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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