Quantcast

Latest NINDS brain trauma research Stories

2012-03-24 04:59:12

Kessler Foundation stroke expert co-chairs review of rehabilitation and recovery; working group sets priorities for future research In 2011, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) convened the Stroke Progress Review Group (SPRG) to conduct a final 10-year review of the state of stroke research. The goal is to set priorities and shape future NINDS programs and policies.  While SPRG found much available data for maximizing stroke rehabilitation effects,...

2012-01-31 09:14:15

In the US alone, at least 500,000 people suffer from Parkinson's disease, a neurological disorder that affects a person's ability to control his or her movement. New technology from the University of Bonn in Germany lets researchers observe the development of the brain cells responsible for the disease. Up until now, research into the brain cells responsible for Parkinson's disease has focused on the function and degeneration of these neurons in the adult and aging brain. The new tissue...

2012-01-12 21:10:20

For years, researchers seeking new therapies for traumatic brain injury have been tantalized by the results of animal experiments with stem cells. In numerous studies, stem cell implantation has substantially improved brain function in experimental animals with brain trauma. But just how these improvements occur has remained a mystery. Now, an important part of this puzzle has been pieced together by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. In experiments with...

2011-05-16 14:34:20

A protective molecule has been identified in the brain which, if used artificially, may prevent brain damage from the likes of stroke, head injury and Alzheimer's. By looking at what happens in the brain after an injury, new research has finally ended speculation over whether a key molecule, 'KCC2' causes brain cell death after an injury or prevents it. The finding, published today (16th May 2011) in The Journal of Physiology now opens the door to the development of artificial forms of the...

2011-05-12 22:51:21

New data offer hints to why Parkinson's disease so selectively harms brain cells that produce the chemical dopamine, say researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Dopamine is involved in brain cell communications including the signals that control movement. As Parkinson's kills the dopamine-producing cells, patients begin to develop tremors, problems moving and other symptoms. The new research shows that a drug known to damage dopamine-producing nerve cells and...

2011-03-18 15:04:08

After disruption, mouse brains shift key functions associated with learning and memory, U-M study finds When Geoffrey Murphy, Ph.D., talks about plastic structures, he's not talking about the same thing as Mr. McGuire in The Graduate. To Murphy, an associate professor of molecular and integrative physiology at the University of Michigan Medical School, plasticity refers to the brain's ability to change as we learn. Murphy's lab, in collaboration with U-M's Neurodevelopment and Regeneration...

2011-01-27 01:00:00

BETHESDA, Md., Jan. 27, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- BrainScope Company, Inc. today announced its sponsorship of a multi-center, observational clinical study, the "B-Ahead U.K. Trial", utilizing its technology in development to aid in the assessment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its milder forms (commonly referred to as "concussion") in emergency departments in the United Kingdom. Dr. Rupert Pearse, M.D. from Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry will serve as chief...

68ea429a60f94313f3f0dc6466e7d11e1
2010-05-07 13:48:12

Stem cells derived from the endometrium (uterine lining) and transplanted into the brains of laboratory mice with Parkinson's disease appear to restore functioning of brain cells damaged by the disease, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers. The findings are published in the Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine. Although these are preliminary results, the findings increase the likelihood that endometrial tissue could be harvested from women with Parkinson's...

2009-06-17 09:25:00

There is a new "HUMMR" on the block. It is smaller than its automotive counterpart, but no less powerful.Scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center have identified a protein, which they have dubbed HUMMR (hypoxia upregulated mitochondrial movement regulator) that may shed new light on how the brain recovers from a stroke.The primary role of HUMMR is to regulate the proper transport and distribution of mitochondria throughout the cell, essentially ensuring that they are in the...

2009-06-15 09:55:04

Scientists have identified a protein in the brain that plays a key role in the function of mitochondria "“ the part of the cell that supplies energy, supports cellular activity, and potentially wards off threats from disease. The discovery, which was reported today in the Journal of Cell Biology, may shed new light on how the brain recovers from stroke."Understanding the molecular machinery that helps distribute mitochondria to different parts of the cell has only recently begun to be...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
Related