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Latest NIST-F1 Stories

New U.S. Time Standard Launched By NIST
2014-04-04 13:21:23

[ Watch The Video: NIST-F2 Atomic Clock Sets The Time Standard ] NIST The U.S. Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has officially launched a new atomic clock, called NIST-F2, to serve as a new US civilian time and frequency standard, along with the current NIST-F1 standard. NIST-F2 would neither gain nor lose one second in about 300 million years, making it about three times as accurate as NIST-F1, which has served as the standard...

JILA Strontium Atomic Clock Unveiled And Sets New Records In Precision, Stability
2014-01-23 09:53:25

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Heralding a new age of terrific timekeeping, a research group led by a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) physicist has unveiled an experimental strontium atomic clock that has set new world records for both precision and stability-- key metrics for the performance of a clock. The clock is in a laboratory at JILA, a joint institute of NIST and the University of Colorado Boulder. Described in a new paper in...

New Compact Atomic Clock Design Uses Cold Atoms To Boost Precision
2013-11-06 12:03:09

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a compact atomic clock design that relies on cold rubidium atoms instead of the usual hot atoms, a switch that promises improved precision and stability. Described in a new paper, the heart of the prototype clock (the vacuum chamber containing the atoms) is about the size of a coffee mug, 150 cubic centimeters, set in a small table of lasers and...

New Stability Record Set By NIST Ytterbium Atomic Clocks
2013-08-22 14:45:09

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) A pair of experimental atomic clocks based on ytterbium atoms at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has set a new record for stability. The clocks act like 21st-century pendulums or metronomes that could swing back and forth with perfect timing for a period comparable to the age of the universe. NIST physicists report in the Aug. 22 issue of Science Express that the ytterbium clocks' tick is more stable than...

2012-04-30 14:48:01

Transmitting extremely precise clock signals over long distances could help pave the way to a new definition of the second Atomic clocks based on the oscillations of a cesium atom keep amazingly steady time and also define the precise length of a second. But cesium clocks are no longer the most accurate. That title has been transferred to an optical clock housed at the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, Colo. that can keep time to within 1 second in 3.7...

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2010-02-05 13:22:06

Clock keeps time to 1 second in 3.7 billion years Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built an enhanced version of an experimental atomic clock based on a single aluminum atom that is now the world's most precise clock, more than twice as precise as the previous pacesetter based on a mercury atom. The new aluminum clock would neither gain nor lose one second in about 3.7 billion years, according to measurements to be reported in Physical Review...

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2009-08-11 16:30:00

An experimental atomic clock based on ytterbium atoms is about four times more accurate than it was several years ago, giving it a precision comparable to that of the NIST-F1 cesium fountain clock, the nation's civilian time standard, scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) report in Physical Review Letters.*NIST scientists evaluated the clock by measuring the natural frequency of ytterbium, carefully accounting for all possible deviations such as those caused...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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