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Latest Nitrogen cycle Stories

2014-05-20 12:17:44

University of Montana A new paper co-written by four University of Montana researchers finds that humans have more than doubled tropical nitrogen inputs. Benjamin Sullivan, a researcher working with UM College of Forestry and Conservation Professor Cory Cleveland, led the team that looked at the nitrogen cycle in tropical rain forests. Sullivan and his colleagues used a new method to demonstrate that biological nitrogen fixation in tropical rain forests may be less than a quarter of...

Rhode Island Nitrogen Cycle Differs In Bay And Sound
2014-04-29 17:17:11

Brown University A new study reports that anammox, a key process in the nitrogen cycle, is barely present in Narragansett Bay even though it’s a major factor just a little farther out into Rhode Island Sound. Scientists traced that to differences between bay and sound sediments, but that raises new questions about what’s going on in the Bay to account for those. Rhode Island’s geography is famously small, but new measurements of the nitrogen cycle in its waterways suggest that...

Study May Resolve Controversy Over Nitrogen’s Ocean Exit Strategies
2014-04-14 12:19:53

By Catherine Zandonella, Princeton University A decades-long debate over how nitrogen is removed from the ocean may now be settled by new findings from researchers at Princeton University and their collaborators at the University of Washington. The debate centers on how nitrogen — one of the most important food sources for ocean life and a controller of atmospheric carbon dioxide — becomes converted to a form that can exit the ocean and return to the atmosphere where it is reused...

The Oceans Nitrogen Puzzle
2013-11-05 07:55:09

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft Nitrogen isotope effects by anammox deciphered A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, the University of Basel, and Radboud University Nijmegen has now revealed the details of an important microbial process regulating the global nitrogen budget in the oceans. They present their results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Every organism needs nitrogen to survive and...

El Nino Nitrous Oxide Global Warming
2013-09-27 12:13:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Nitrous oxide, commonly referred to as ‘laughing gas,’ is well known for its use on dental patients ahead of a painful procedure. However, a lesser-known fact is that it’s also the third-largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions after carbon dioxide and methane. New research from MIT and Emory University researchers has found that the Pacific Ocean weather patterns known as El Niño and La Niña have a significant effect on...

Wobble Of The Earth Rings The Ocean Dinner Bell For Tiny Ocean Creatures
2013-09-14 04:18:52

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The nutrient known as “fixed” nitrogen, which is essential to the health of the ocean, is controlled by the cyclic wobble of the Earth on its axis, researchers from Princeton University and the Swiss Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH) claim in research appearing in the journal Nature. According to the study authors, the discovery will give scientists new insight into how the ocean regulates its own life-support system,...

Rising Temperatures Could Upset Natural Ocean Cycles
2013-09-09 04:15:09

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Rising water temperatures will have an adverse impact on plankton, serving as the catalyst for a series of events that will upset the balance of essential oceanic chemical cycles, according to new research published in Sunday’s edition of the journal Nature Climate Change. Scientists from the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK examined the impact that ocean temperatures can have on the plankton ecosystems found in the...

2013-08-08 14:02:31

1 species of bacteria rides the other down through sediment like an elevator, then closes the loop on the ocean's nitrogen cycle In a discovery that further demonstrates just how unexpected and unusual nature can be, scientists have found two strains of bacteria whose symbiotic relationship is unlike anything seen before. Long, thin, hairlike Thioploca (meaning "sulfur braids" in Spanish) trichomes form chains down into marine sediment, which tiny anammox cells ride down like an...

Homes Of Giant Bacteria Invaded By Strangers
2013-08-08 09:05:48

University of Southern Denmark Life is not a walk in the park for the world's largest bacteria, that live as soft, noodle-like, white strings on the bottom of the ocean depths. Without being able to fend for themselves, they get invaded by parasitic microorganisms that steal the nutrition, that they have painstakingly retrieved. This newly discovered bizarre deep ocean relationship may ultimately impact ocean productivity, report researchers from University of Southern Denmark now in the...

Oceans Of The Past Give Clues To The Future
2013-06-15 05:39:41

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The oceans of the past were quite different than the ones we see today. Ocean temperatures are increasing due to global warming, and these increases are harming marine food webs. Coastal dead zones are also being created by the run-off from fertilizers. An international team of researchers, led by McGill University, has completed the first global study of changes that occurred during the nitrogen cycle at the end of the last ice age....


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'