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Latest NMDA receptor Stories

2013-03-14 17:57:23

Since the 1960s, psychiatrists have been hunting for substances made by the body that might accumulate in abnormally high levels to produce the symptoms associated with schizophrenia.

2013-01-01 10:47:31

Jackson Laboratory researchers led by Associate Professor Zhong-wei Zhang, Ph.D., have provided direct evidence that a specific neurotransmitter receptor is vital to the process of pruning synapses in the brains of newborn mammals.

2012-12-13 12:29:17

A drug that works through the same brain mechanism as the fast-acting antidepressant ketamine briefly improved treatment-resistant patients' depression symptoms in minutes, with minimal untoward side effects, in a clinical trial conducted by the National Institutes of Health.

2012-08-07 23:17:46

Scientists have discovered a biological marker that may help to identify which depressed patients will respond to an experimental, rapid-acting antidepressant.

2012-02-21 14:06:49

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have designed, produced and patented a new chemical compound for the possible treatment of brain damage caused by stroke.

Mouse Study Sheds Light On Controlling Hunger
2012-02-08 14:40:15

Researchers have revealed that the neural circuits controlling hunger and eating behaviors are also controlled by plasticity.

2011-12-21 22:46:41

A brain cell type found where habits are formed and movement is controlled has receptors that work like computer processors to translate regular activities into habits.

2011-10-11 17:55:39

A tiny piece of a critical receptor that fuels the brain and without which sentient beings cannot live has been discovered by University at Buffalo scientists as a promising new drug target for Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases.


Word of the Day
gawf
  • In costermongers' slang, a cheap red-skinned apple, which is rubbed hard with a cloth to give it the appearance and feeling of an apple of superior quality.
The origin of the word 'gawf' is obscure, but may come from the phrase 'go for more'.