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Latest Noah Diffenbaugh Stories

Global Warming Driving Severe Thunderstorms
2013-09-24 09:36:10

[ Watch the Video: Thunderstorms Could Become More Severe In The US ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The risk of severe thunderstorms capable of producing extreme amounts of precipitation and tornadoes is expected to increase in frequency in the US, according to new research published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Weather disasters, including severe thunderstorms, caused more than $1 billion worth of economic...

Global Warming Increases Risk Of Record Heat
2013-09-06 04:50:27

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Last July was the hottest month in the history of US weather record keeping, but it may not hold that title for long, researchers from Stanford University claim in a recently-published report. According to Noah Diffenbaugh, an associate professor of environmental Earth system science at the California institution, and research assistant Martin Scherer, extreme weather is more than four times more likely to occur now than it was...

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2011-07-01 09:27:54

Higher temperatures could significantly impact California and other premium winegrowing regions of the United States in the next 30 years, according to a new study led by Stanford University climate scientists. Writing in the June 30 edition of Environmental Research Letters, the scientists report that by 2040, the amount of land suitable for cultivating premium wine grapes in high-value areas of northern California could shrink by 50 percent because of global warming. However, some cooler...

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2011-06-11 08:48:04

According to a new study on climate change, researchers project that, by 2050, the coolest summers in the tropics and parts of the northern hemisphere will still be hotter than the hottest summers seen since the 1950s if global warming continues its rapid upswing. "The permanent emergence of unprecedented summer heat" could be felt in tropical regions in Africa, Asia and South America within the coming decades, according to the study, being published in the journal Climate Change Letters...

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2011-06-06 14:00:00

The tropics and much of the Northern Hemisphere are likely to experience an irreversible rise in summer temperatures within the next 20 to 60 years if atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations continue to increase, according to a new climate study by Stanford University scientists. The results will be published later this month in the journal Climatic Change. In the study, the Stanford team concluded that many tropical regions in Africa, Asia and South America could see "the permanent...

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2010-07-08 14:06:34

Exceptionally long heat waves and other hot events could become commonplace in the United States in the next 30 years, according to a new study by Stanford University climate scientists. "Using a large suite of climate model experiments, we see a clear emergence of much more intense, hot conditions in the U.S. within the next three decades," said Noah Diffenbaugh, an assistant professor of environmental Earth system science at Stanford and the lead author of the study. Writing in the journal...

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2009-12-15 08:34:13

When it comes to nature, timing is everything. Spring flowers depend on birds and insects for pollination. But if spring-like weather arrives earlier than usual, and flowers bloom and wither before the pollinators appear, the consequences could be devastating for both the plants and the animals that feed on them. Global warming has made the early arrival of spring commonplace across the planet, say climate scientists. Plants are blooming earlier, birds are nesting sooner and mammals are...

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2009-08-20 11:15:00

Urban workers could suffer most from climate change as the cost of food drives them into poverty, according to a new study that quantifies the effects of climate on the world's poor populations.A team led by Purdue University researchers examined the potential economic influence of adverse climate events, such as heat waves, drought and heavy rains, on those in 16 developing countries. Urban workers in Bangladesh, Mexico and Zambia were found to be the most at risk."Extreme weather affects...

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2009-03-01 11:17:13

The South Asian summer monsoon - critical to agriculture in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan - could be weakened and delayed due to rising temperatures in the future, according to a recent climate modeling study. A Purdue University research group found that climate change could influence monsoon dynamics and cause less summer precipitation, a delay in the start of monsoon season and longer breaks between the rainy periods. Noah Diffenbaugh, whose research group led the study, said the...

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2008-12-16 16:13:27

Climate change could provide the warmer weather pests prefer, leading to an increase in populations that feed on corn and other crops, according to a new study. Warmer growing season temperatures and milder winters could allow some of these insects to expand their territory and produce an extra generation of offspring each year, said Noah Diffenbaugh, the Purdue University associate professor of earth and atmospheric sciences who led the study. "Our projections showed all of the species...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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