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Latest Noise Stories

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2008-03-05 17:00:00

Scientists have solved a 40-year-old puzzle by identifying the origin of the intense radio waves in the Earth's upper atmosphere that control the dynamics of the Van Allen radiation belts "” belts consisting of high-energy electrons that can damage satellites and spacecraft and pose a risk to astronauts performing activities outside their spacecraft. The source of these low-frequency radio waves, which are known as plasmaspheric hiss, turns out to be not lightning or instabilities from...

2006-07-05 08:20:00

LONDON -- Belgian scientists have pinpointed three genes which could explain why some people exposed to loud noise suffer hearing loss. The genes discovered by Professor Guy Van Camp and researchers at the University of Antwerp are involved in the recycling of potassium in the inner ear, which is essential for normal hearing. Dr Ralph Holme, of Britain's national charity for the deaf and hard of hearing RNID, which funded the research, described the finding as a very exciting breakthrough....

2006-06-12 09:13:16

NEW YORK (AP) - Students are using a new ring tone to receive messages in class -- and many teachers can't even hear the ring. Some students are downloading a ring tone off the Internet that is too high-pitched to be heard by most adults. With it, high schoolers can receive text message alerts on their cell phones without the teacher knowing. As people age, many develop what's known as aging ear -- a loss of the ability to hear higher-frequency sounds. The ring tone is a spin-off of...

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2006-03-24 13:30:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Living or working in noisy surroundings may raise a person's risk of suffering a heart attack, a new study suggests. Researchers in Germany found that urban middle-aged adults who lived near high-traffic roads were 46 percent more likely to suffer a heart attack than those who lived in more peaceful neighborhoods. Similarly, men whose jobs exposed them to high noise levels were about one-third more likely to have a heart attack than their peers in quieter...

2006-02-16 11:25:00

NEW YORK -- Research suggests that prolonged exposure to loud noise increases the risk of acoustic neuroma, a benign tumor that grows in the nerve connecting the ear to the brain that is associated with hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and disequilibrium. The only published study regarding noise and acoustic neuroma risk was limited by small size and its restriction to men only, Dr. Colin G. Edwards and colleagues note in their report, published in the American Journal of...

2005-11-30 13:55:00

LONDON (Reuters) - A Welsh inventor claims to have found the perfect solution to rowdy youngsters -- noise. Howard Stapleton says his device, the "Mosquito," emits an uncomfortable high-pitched ultrasonic sound that can be heard by children and teenagers but almost no one over 30. It has successfully driven away noisy teens from a grocery store in the Welsh town of Barry and a shop in Stapleton's home town Merthyr Tydfil, making smoking, lounging and foul-mouthed youths a thing of the past....

2005-11-22 16:50:00

GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- As airline travel peaks for the Thanksgiving holiday, a newly completed wind tunnel at the University of Florida may help reduce the noise of commercial airplanes as they fly over homes and neighborhoods. The tunnel is one of only a handful in the country and currently the largest at a university designed specifically to reduce noise from planes passing overhead and landing. Engineers will use the $400,000 tunnel to learn how to reduce the noise caused by the flow of...

2005-09-15 06:07:35

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Forget about watching, Big Brother may be listening. Sounds from typing on computer keyboards are distinctive enough to be decoded, allowing security breaches caused by "acoustic snooping," University of California, Berkeley researchers said on Wednesday. The researchers said they were able to feed sound recordings of typing on keyboards into a computer and use an algorithm to recover up to 96 percent of the keyboard characters entered by typists. "It's a...

2005-07-06 15:03:47

We usually think of noise as a bad thing "” like the background sound of street traffic that makes it hard to hear a conversation or your favorite CD. Researchers know that such extraneous stimuli exist for other senses, too: Noise can affect your ability not only to hear, but also to see and feel. But it's not always a bad thing, it turns out. Researchers from the University of British Columbia recently showed that noise can at times help, rather than hinder, people's ability to sense...

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2005-06-03 07:19:15

Those exposed to constant airplane noise showed delayed reading abilities Exposure to high levels of airplane noise may be linked to delayed reading abilities and memory problems among youngsters, a new study finds. While the effects of air pollution on children's health are well known, less is understood about the damage environmental noise could cause. "We looked at the effects of air traffic and road traffic noise on children's health and cognitive development," explained lead researcher...


Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'