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Latest Noncoding DNA Stories

2013-06-24 14:45:26

Scientists from Australia and the United States bring new insights to our understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the genome, one of the biggest challenges currently facing the fields of genomics and genetics. Their findings are published in Nature Genetics, online today. Roughly 3 meters of DNA is tightly folded into the nucleus of every cell in our body. This folding allows some genes to be 'expressed', or activated, while excluding others. Dr Tim Mercer and Professor John...

2013-06-17 09:56:18

Because of their central importance to biology, proteins have been the focus of intense research, particularly the manner in which they are produced from genetically coded templates–a process commonly known as translation. While the general mechanism of translation has been understood for some time, protein synthesis can initiate by more than one mechanism. One of the least well understood mechanisms is known as cap-independent translation. Now, John Chaput and his colleagues at...

Carnivorous Plant Gets Rid Of Its Junk DNA
2013-05-13 11:22:44

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online There are approximately 3 billion base pairs in the human genome, however, only about 2 percent of those are actual genes. The rest is considered ℠junk´ DNA. For years, scientists have puzzled over the question of why so much of the human genome appears to be useless, and a new study on a bizarre wetland plant could be the key to solving the genetic mystery. Utricularia gibba is a carnivorous plant that...

2013-02-25 10:45:11

Scripps Research Institute team shows how DNA sequences long considered 'junk' are involved in gene regulation Small stretches of DNA in the human genome are known as "pseudogenes" because, while their sequences are nearly identical to those of various genes, they have long been thought to be non-coding "junk" DNA. But now, a new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) shows how pseudogenes can regulate the activity of a cancer-related gene called PTEN. The...

Shining Light On Important Role Performed By Dark Matter Within Each Of Our Genes
2013-01-07 09:28:56

University of North Carolina Health Care Research findings from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine are shining a light on an important regulatory role performed by the so-called dark matter, or "junk DNA," within each of our genes. The new study reveals snippets of information contained in dark matter that can alter the way a gene is assembled. "These small sequences of genetic information tell the gene how to splice, either by enhancing the splicing process or...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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