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Latest Nonmetals Stories

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2011-08-22 12:30:28

Researchers from the University of Western Australia and the University of Oxford have unearthed what they believe are the oldest fossils ever discovered-single-celled organisms that are thought to be 3.4 billion years old, according to a Sunday article by Nicholas Wade of the New York Times. The discovery, which is detailed in the latest edition of the journal Nature Geoscience, took place in a remote location known as Strelley Pool, which is located in Western Australia. The team that...

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2011-08-15 06:47:49

Material designed for energy applications is 10 times faster than natural enzyme, uses inexpensive metals Looking to nature for their muse, researchers have used a common protein to guide the design of a material that can make energy-storing hydrogen gas. The synthetic material works 10 times faster than the original protein found in water-dwelling microbes, the researchers report in the August 12 issue of the journal Science, clocking in at 100,000 molecules of hydrogen gas every second....

2011-08-03 07:29:00

ORCHARD, Texas, Aug. 3, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Oxygen Orchard (Pinksheets: GTLL) announced today founding of the Biomedical Foundation, (BFOR) a non-profit organization which will raise funds for clinical testing, will act as the repository for oxygen research, past, present and future, and will act as the bullhorn for disseminating data to medical professionals as well as to the public. Mrs. Teri Mathis, President and CEO of Oxygen Orchard, is the co-founder of BFOR. Currently based in...

2011-08-01 12:06:10

Mathematical modeling to ensure that climate-friendly alternatives to fossil fuel do not harm health and environment Replacing gasoline and diesel with plant-based bio fuels is crucial to curb climate change. But there are several ways to transform crops to fuel, and some of the methods result in bio fuels that are harmful to health as well as nature. Now a study from the University of Copenhagen shows that it is possible to predict just how toxic the fuel will become without producing a...

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2011-07-25 11:45:00

Fool's gold is providing scientists with valuable insights into a turning point in the Earth's evolution, which took place billions of years ago. Scientists are recreating ancient forms of the mineral pyrite "“ dubbed fool's gold for its metallic luster "“ that reveal details of past geological events. Detailed analysis of the mineral is giving fresh insight into the Earth before the Great Oxygenation Event, which took place 2.4 billion years ago. This was a time when oxygen...

2011-06-14 01:32:38

In the search for superconductors, finding ways to compress hydrogen into a metal has been a point of focus ever since scientists predicted many years ago that electricity would flow, uninhibited, through such a material. Liquid metallic hydrogen is thought to exist in the high-gravity interiors of Jupiter and Saturn. But so far, on Earth, researchers have been unable to use static compression techniques to squeeze hydrogen under high enough pressures to convert it into a metal. Shock-wave...

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2011-06-09 05:25:00

Where does water end and air begin? Scientists found that some water molecules exist as both a gas and a liquid by splitting the difference between the two, according to a new study in Nature. In the uppermost layer of water, the boundary between gas and liquid occurs in one quarter of water molecules, where one hydrogen atom is in the water and the other vibrates freely above it. These molecules straddle between gas and liquid phases, says senior author Alexander Benderskii of the University...

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2011-05-16 10:44:19

An international team, of scientists, led by a team at Monash University has found the key to the hydrogen economy could come from a very simple mineral, commonly seen as a black stain on rocks. Their findings, developed with the assistance of researchers at UC Davis in the USA and using the facilities at the Australian Synchrotron, was published in the journal Nature Chemistry yesterday 15 May 2011. Professor Leone Spiccia from the School of Chemistry at Monash University said the ultimate...

2011-05-11 12:49:26

Although some people believe that taking selenium can reduce a person's risk of cancer, a Cochrane Systematic Review of randomised controlled clinical trials found no protective effect against non-melanoma skin cancer or prostate cancer. In addition, there is some indication that taking selenium over a long period of time could have toxic effects. These conclusions were reached after researchers scanned the medical literature, looking for trials that studied the effects of taking selenium...

2011-05-11 00:27:49

This discovery will make it possible to improve photoelectrochemical cells. In the same way that plants use photosynthesis to transform sunlight into energy, these cells use sunlight to drive chemical reactions that ultimately produce hydrogen from water. The process involves using a light-sensitive semi-conducting material such as cuprous oxide to provide the current needed to fuel the reaction. Although it is not expensive, the oxide is unstable if exposed to light in water. Research by...


Latest Nonmetals Reference Libraries

Acid Rain
2013-04-01 10:21:17

Acid rain is any form of precipitation that is unusually acidic, meaning that is possesses high levels of hydrogen ions. It can have harmful effects on aquatic animals, plants, and infrastructure. Acid rain is caused by emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, which react with the water molecules within the atmosphere to produce acids. Nitrogen oxides can be produced naturally by lightening strikes. Sulfur dioxide can be produced naturally by volcanic eruptions. The chemicals that are...

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Word of the Day
lambent
  • Licking.
  • Hence Running along or over a surface, as if in the act of licking; flowing over or along; lapping or bathing; softly bright; gleaming.
This word comes the Latin 'lambere,' to lick.
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