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Latest Nonmetals Stories

2009-06-26 08:36:17

A research team headed by Dr. Jonathan R. Nitschke at the University of Cambridge (UK) and Academy Professor Kari Rissanen at the University of Jyväskylä (Finland) has made a breakthrough in rendering white phosphorus table to air, as reported in the latest issue of Science.White phosphorus, a molecular solid consisting of discrete P4 tetrahedra, is ordinarily pyrophoric (and thus stored under water) - it bursts spontaneously into flame upon contact with atmospheric oxygen (when...

2009-06-23 15:35:00

Prairie dogs may seem like harmless little creatures, but they can inflict serious injury on plants simply by snacking on them. Plants cannot flee from their furry predators, so how do they avoid becoming a prairie dog's lunch?Dr. John Freeman and colleagues explore the role of metal hyperaccumulation in plant defense in the June 2009 issue of the American Journal of Botany. Certain plants species growing on soils with high metal content (such as arsenic, copper, selenium, and lead)...

2009-06-23 11:55:56

U.S. scientists studying chemical bonds have discovered such bonds do not necessarily break faster when they are stretched. Our findings contradict the intuitive notion that molecules are like rubber bands in that when we pull on a chemical bond, it should always break faster, said University of Illinois Professor Roman Boulatov, who led the study. When we stretch a sulfur-sulfur bond, for example, how fast it breaks depends on how the nearby atoms move. Boulatov said the findings also...

2009-04-29 08:54:31

The recent deaths of 21 polo ponies in Florida was caused by an overdose of the mineral supplement selenium, Florida's state veterinarian says. Veterinarian Thomas J. Holt says toxicology results indicate the horses had as much as 15 times the normal amount of selenium in their blood and an even higher concentration in their livers, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel reported Wednesday Officials say now that they know what killed the polo ponies, investigators must determine how the overdose...

2009-04-17 11:14:53

Sedimentary rocks created more than 2.4 billion years ago sometimes have an unusual sulfur isotope composition thought to be caused by the action of ultra violet light on volcanically produced sulfur dioxide in an oxygen poor atmosphere. Now a team of geochemists can show an alternative origin for this isotopic composition that may point to an early, oxygen-rich atmosphere."The significance of this finding is that an abnormal isotope fractionation (of sulfur) may not be linked to the...

2009-04-16 15:05:10

U.S. researchers say a study of sedimentary rocks created more than 2.4 billion years ago suggests the Earth had an early, oxygen-rich atmosphere. Pennsylvania State University researcher Yumiko Watanabe said rocks sometimes have an unusual sulfur isotope composition thought to be caused by the action of ultra violet light on volcanically produced sulfur dioxide in an oxygen poor atmosphere. But the team of geochemists said they can show an alternative origin for that isotopic composition...

2009-04-06 09:16:47

Weizmann Institute Scientists Develop a Unique Approach for Splitting Water into Hydrogen and Oxygen The design of efficient systems for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen, driven by sunlight is among the most important challenges facing science today, underpinning the long term potential of hydrogen as a clean, sustainable fuel. But man-made systems that exist today are very inefficient and often require additional use of sacrificial chemical agents. In this context, it is important to...

2009-03-22 10:47:04

The most abundant material on Earth exhibits some unusual chemical properties when placed under extreme conditions. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have shown that water, in hot dense environments, plays an unexpected role in catalyzing complex explosive reactions. A catalyst is a compound that speeds chemical reactions without being consumed. Platinum and enzymes are common catalysts. But water rarely, if ever, acts as a catalyst under ordinary conditions. Detonations of...

2009-03-17 11:41:29

The result might help understand chemical processes in energy generation or pollution cleanupSingle oxygen atoms dancing on a metal oxide slab, glowing brighter here and dimmer there, have helped chemists better understand how water splits into oxygen and hydrogen. In the process, the scientists have visualized a chemical reaction that had previously only been talked about. The new work improves our understanding of the chemistry needed to generate hydrogen fuel from water or to clean...

2009-02-17 09:32:17

U.S. chemists say they've developed a class of new porous materials that are very effective at purifying hydrogen by separating it from complex gas mixtures. Northwestern University Professor Mercouri Kanatzidis and postdoctoral researcher Gerasimos Armatas said their new materials exhibit excellent selectivity in separating hydrogen from carbon dioxide and methane. A more selective process means fewer cycles to produce pure hydrogen, increasing efficiency, said Kanatzidis. Our materials...


Latest Nonmetals Reference Libraries

Acid Rain
2013-04-01 10:21:17

Acid rain is any form of precipitation that is unusually acidic, meaning that is possesses high levels of hydrogen ions. It can have harmful effects on aquatic animals, plants, and infrastructure. Acid rain is caused by emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, which react with the water molecules within the atmosphere to produce acids. Nitrogen oxides can be produced naturally by lightening strikes. Sulfur dioxide can be produced naturally by volcanic eruptions. The chemicals that are...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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