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Latest Nonmetals Stories

Sulphur And Iron Commonly Found In Old Shipwrecks
2012-05-16 08:47:46

Sulphur and iron compounds have been found in shipwrecks off the coast of Sweden and in the Baltic Sea, according to a new study. The group behind the results includes scientists from the University of Gothenburg and Stockholm University. The results were presented recently in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Scientists reported large quantities of sulphur and iron compounds in the salvaged 17th century warship Vasa a few years ago. This resulted in the development of sulphuric acid...

2012-05-15 22:46:52

It may seem counterintuitive, but one way to reduce carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere may be to produce pure carbon dioxide in powerplants that burn fossil fuels. In this way, greenhouse gases – once isolated within a plant – could be captured and stored in natural reservoirs, deep in Earth's crust. Such "carbon-capture" technology may significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cheap and plentiful energy sources such as coal and natural gas, and help minimize...

2012-05-09 21:04:54

A detailed description of development of the first practical artificial leaf – a milestone in the drive for sustainable energy that mimics the process, photosynthesis, that green plants use to convert water and sunlight into energy – appears in the ACS journal Accounts of Chemical Research. The article notes that unlike earlier devices, which used costly ingredients, the new device is made from inexpensive materials and employs low-cost engineering and manufacturing processes....

2012-04-13 11:51:34

How hydrogen--the most abundant element in the cosmos--responds to extremes of pressure and temperature is one of the major challenges in modern physical science. Moreover, knowledge gleaned from experiments using hydrogen as a testing ground on the nature of chemical bonding can fundamentally expand our understanding of matter. New work from Carnegie scientists has enabled researchers to examine hydrogen under pressures never before possible. Their work is published online in Physical Review...

2012-03-30 08:04:18

Imagine being able to use electricity to power your car – even if it's not an electric vehicle. Researchers at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science have for the first time demonstrated a method for converting carbon dioxide into liquid fuel isobutanol using electricity. Today, electrical energy generated by various methods is still difficult to store efficiently. Chemical batteries, hydraulic pumping and water splitting suffer from low energy-density...

2012-03-21 15:36:50

Spanish and Danish researchers have developed a method for the in vivo study of the unknown metabolism of selenium, an essential element for living beings. The technique can help clarify whether or not it possesses the anti-tumor properties that have been attributed to it and yet have not been verified through clinical trials. "It is vox populi that doctors around the world recommend selenium supplements to complement traditional therapy against cancer and the AIDS virus but the truth is...

2012-03-15 16:51:27

Iron is key to reversing global warming, Concordia and McGill research shows Canada defines itself as a nation that stretches from coast to coast to coast. But can we keep those coasts healthy in the face of climate change? Yves Gélinas, associate professor in Concordia´s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, has found the solution in a surprising element: iron. In a study published in Nature, Gélinas – along with Concordia PhD candidate Karine...

2012-02-24 18:00:48

Researchers at the universities of Granada and Barcelona have described for the first time the diffusion of liquid water through nanochannels in molecular terms; nanochannels are extremely tiny channels with a diameter of 1-100 nanometers that scientists use to study the behavior of molecules (nm. a unit of length in the metric system equal to one billionth of a meter that is used in the field of nanotechnology). This study might have an important impact on water desalinization and...

2012-02-22 21:37:10

New analyses of more than 4,000 scientific studies have concluded that a family of "miracle materials" called MOFs have a bright future in products and technologies – ranging from the fuel tanks in hydrogen-powered cars to muting the effects of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide – that are critical for solving some of the greatest global challenges of the 21st century. The 18 articles examining 4,283 pieces of research on MOFs published in the past appear in a special edition of...

2012-02-08 23:57:20

Scientists have developed a new kind of tiny motor – which they term a "microrocket" – that can propel itself through acidic environments, such as the human stomach, without any external energy source, opening the way to a variety of medical and industrial applications. Their report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society describes the microrockets traveling at virtual warp speed for such devices. A human moving at the same speed would have to run at a clip of 400 miles...


Latest Nonmetals Reference Libraries

Acid Rain
2013-04-01 10:21:17

Acid rain is any form of precipitation that is unusually acidic, meaning that is possesses high levels of hydrogen ions. It can have harmful effects on aquatic animals, plants, and infrastructure. Acid rain is caused by emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, which react with the water molecules within the atmosphere to produce acids. Nitrogen oxides can be produced naturally by lightening strikes. Sulfur dioxide can be produced naturally by volcanic eruptions. The chemicals that are...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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