Quantcast

Latest Nonsyndromic deafness Stories

2012-11-06 03:34:34

Genetic testing for a certain mutation in pediatric patients is valuable in determining a cause for unexplained hearing loss, according to a study in the November 2012 issue of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery. The study's authors state that testing for some of the most common mutations that cause sensorineural hearing loss in a targeted way, rather than through generalized screening of hearing loss patients, yields the best results. University of Miami NIH-funded researchers...

Hearing Loss Gene Discovered
2012-10-01 05:38:50

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A team of researchers, led by members of the University of Cincinnati (UC) and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, have reportedly discovered a new genetic mutation that leads to deafness and hearing loss associated with a relatively rare condition. In a September 30 press release, lead investigator and UC assistant professor of ophthalmology Zubair Ahmed explain that he and his colleagues were "able to pinpoint the...

2012-07-26 06:46:08

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The sound of a horn beeping at you while driving, the chirping crickets after a huge rain storm, and your favorite new One Direction song -- imagine going through life not being able to hear any of it. That is a reality for those living with hearing loss. Now, researchers are trying new things to turn up the volume for the deaf. A new gene therapy approach can reverse hearing loss caused by a genetic defect in a mouse model of congenital deafness. New findings present...

2012-07-26 01:05:02

A new gene therapy approach can reverse hearing loss caused by a genetic defect in a mouse model of congenital deafness, according to a preclinical study published by Cell Press in the July 26 issue of the journal Neuron. The findings present a promising therapeutic avenue for potentially treating individuals who are born deaf. "This is the first time that an inherited, genetic hearing loss has been successfully treated in laboratory mice, and as such represents an important milestone for...

2011-09-14 13:18:40

Precise diagnosis of disease and developmental syndromes often depends on understanding the genetics underlying them. Most cases of early onset hearing loss are genetic in origin but there are many different forms. Heretofore, it has been difficult to identify the gene responsible for the hearing loss of each affected child, because the critical mutations differ among countries and populations. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Genome Biology has identified six...

2011-05-31 16:00:56

Gene mutations on the X chromosome lead to progressive hearing impairment Excessive noise is not the only thing that causes damage to hearing. In many cases, genetic factors are responsible for the loss of hearing at a young age. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin together with colleagues from Nijmegen have discovered a previously unknown genetic cause of progressive hearing impairment: the disease is caused by mutations of the SMPX (small muscle...

2010-11-15 21:33:32

Comprehensive genetic test for inherited hearing loss is cheaper and faster than the current methods, which sequence genes 1 at a time Pinpointing the exact genetic cause of inherited deafness has always involved sequencing one gene at a time, a process that can take up to a year and cost roughly $1,000 per gene. It would cost around $75,000 to test all known deafness causing genes using this approach. Now University of Iowa researchers working with colleagues at Baylor College of Medicine...

2010-02-08 08:12:21

Mimicking hereditary deafness in a mouse brings doctors closer to a cure Deafness is the most common disorder of the senses. Tragically, it commonly strikes in early childhood, severely damaging an affected child's ability to learn speech and language. In many cases, children gradually lose their hearing to become profoundly deaf over a long period of months to years, but scientists know very little about how this progressive loss happens, making prospects for prevention and cure very slim....

2009-12-17 16:53:43

A gene associated with a rare form of progressive deafness in males has been identified by an international team of researchers funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The gene, PRPS1, appears to be crucial in inner ear development and maintenance. The findings are published in the Dec. 17 early online issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics. "This discovery offers exciting therapeutic implications," said James F. Battey, Jr., M.D., Ph.D.,...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
Related