Quantcast

Latest Nora Volkow Stories

44a4678fd96478ccd8b06b5444d85f011
2009-01-20 14:11:21

New research may be able to explain why men are more capable of watching what they eat than women. Women's brains are at fault, researchers said in their report published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "There is something going on in the female," lead researcher Gene-Jack Wang, of Brookhaven National Laboratory, told the Associated Press. "The signal is so much different." He and his colleagues compared the results of positron emission tomography (PET) brain scans from...

b445026ad4719056141304d57e8c2ceb1
2008-12-08 07:25:00

Scientists released a hotly debated commentary Sunday stating that healthy people should have the right to boost their brains with pills, like those prescribed for hyperactive kids or memory-impaired older folks. "We should welcome new methods of improving our brain function," and doing it with pills is no more morally objectionable than eating right or getting a good night's sleep, these experts wrote in an opinion piece published online Sunday by the journal Nature. They say college...

61771c275a17b110081689e94d7ca24e1
2008-08-21 19:18:38

Findings may help explain how sleep-deprived people stay alert Just one night without sleep can increase the amount of the chemical dopamine in the human brain, according to new imaging research in the August 20 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. Because drugs that increase dopamine, like amphetamines, promote wakefulness, the findings offer a potential mechanism explaining how the brain helps people stay awake despite the urge to sleep. However, the study also shows that the increase in...

1e94a2c7800eca15b543920d869fcf65
2008-06-11 00:10:00

More than 100 specialists in exercise and neurobiology came together last week for a two-day conference to discuss physical activity's potential in fighting addiction to drugs and alcohol. The question is just how regular physical activity of varying intensity might affect mood, academic performance, even the very reward systems in the brain that can get hijacked by substance abuse. Exercise's positive effects on overall health and weight loss are well known, but when National Institute on...

2006-07-25 07:05:00

By Andrew Stern CHICAGO -- Convicted of dealing drugs, Cheryl Cline asked for help conquering her long addiction to crack cocaine but was told that even in prison there was a waiting list. "That upset me that I wanted help and I had to wait to get it," Cline said at a news conference on Monday to introduce a U.S. report highlighting the effectiveness of drug treatment for perhaps the most heavily drug-addicted population: prison inmates. The report by the National Institute on Drug Abuse said...

2006-07-24 16:20:04

By Andrew Stern CHICAGO (Reuters) - Convicted of dealing drugs, Cheryl Cline asked for help conquering her long addiction to crack cocaine but was told that even in prison there was a waiting list. "That upset me that I wanted help and I had to wait to get it," Cline said at a news conference on Monday to introduce a U.S. report highlighting the effectiveness of drug treatment for perhaps the most heavily drug-addicted population: prison inmates. The report by the National...

2006-03-17 19:12:11

By Jason Szep BOSTON (Reuters) - When Paul Michaud's father died of cancer, the 16-year-old took OxyContin to ease his emotional pain. He first snorted the prescription painkiller and within weeks he was injecting it into his veins for a more powerful high before turning to heroin as a cheaper option. "It was the one drug that really pulled me. It took away everything," said Michaud, now 18, one of a new generation of American children getting high on and addicted to prescription...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
Related