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Latest north Atlantic Stories

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2006-01-10 05:45:00

NASA -- New scientific findings are strengthening the case that the oceans and climate are linked in an intricate dance, and that rapid climate change may be related to how vigorously ocean currents move heat between low and high latitudes. The research, by Candace Major, an investigator at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, was presented today at a press conference at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco. In the North Atlantic region, the glacial climate...

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2005-12-07 17:19:42

Absent any climate policy, scientists have found a 70 percent chance of shutting down the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean over the next 200 years, with a 45 percent probability of this occurring in this century. The likelihood decreases with mitigation, but even the most rigorous immediate climate policy would still leave a 25 percent chance of a thermohaline collapse. "This is a dangerous, human-induced climate change," said Michael Schlesinger, a professor of...

2005-11-23 20:50:58

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - Rising temperatures trigger a runaway melt of Greenland's ice sheet, raising sea levels and drowning Pacific islands and cities from New York to Tokyo. In Siberia, the permafrost thaws, releasing vast frozen stores of greenhouse gases that send temperatures even higher. In the tropics, the Amazon rainforest starts to die off because of a warmer, drier climate. Such scenarios may read like the script of a Hollywood disaster...

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2005-11-23 20:50:00

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO -- Rising temperatures trigger a runaway melt of Greenland's ice sheet, raising sea levels and drowning Pacific islands and cities from New York to Tokyo. In Siberia, the permafrost thaws, releasing vast frozen stores of greenhouse gases that send temperatures even higher. In the tropics, the Amazon rainforest starts to die off because of a warmer, drier climate. Such scenarios may read like the script of a Hollywood disaster movie but many...

2005-09-28 16:07:29

DURHAM, N.C. -- Duke University oceanographers have developed an explanation for why a vast North Atlantic circulation zone can have a large variability in nutrient supplies needed to sustain ocean plants and, by extension, support the food web of marine life. The circulating zone in the North Atlantic Ocean, known as a "subtropical gyre," swirls in a clockwise direction between the Gulf Stream -- the warm current that bisects the Atlantic between the southern U.S. and northern Europe -- and...

2005-08-20 09:41:00

FREDERICTON, New Brunswick -- Scientists are recommending speed zones for ship traffic as one way to help to help the endangered North Atlantic right whale population. Whale experts studying the right whale in the Bay of Fundy this summer said that while there are more calves than usual, too many of the slow-moving leviathans are being killed in ship collisions. Moira Brown of the New England Aquarium in Boston says the Canadian government's decision to alter shipping lanes in the Bay of...

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2005-08-06 10:28:16

BOSTON (AP) -- Small survey planes, daylight and luck have long been the best tools for scientists hoping to spot the rare North Atlantic right whale. The results aren't too impressive. An estimated one in four whales are spotted by aerial surveys, leaving the rest vulnerable to ship strikes or fishing gear entanglements. But scientists say an underwater listening system they're developing will dramatically improve detection and reduce whale deaths. The "passive acoustic" system would find...

2005-07-24 18:20:13

TALLAHASSEE, FL - The North Atlantic right whale's future looks grim if the current mortality rates continue, according to Florida State University assistant professor of oceanography Douglas Nowacek and a group of fellow scientists from across the nation. They have co-authored a paper titled "North Atlantic Right Whales in Crisis" that appears in the July 22 edition of the journal Science. In it, Nowacek and his colleagues contend that while the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

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2005-07-23 09:58:48

BOSTON -- More than eight in 10 right whale deaths may be going undiscovered, according to marine scientists who called for emergency action to help prevent humans from accidentally killing the rare animal. In an article published in the journal Science, researchers estimated that deaths of North Atlantic right whales may be underreported by as much as 83 percent annually. At least eight whales have died in the last 16 months, and only 350 of the animals are believed to exist. There isn't...

98bcc9743645a2fba475b97efecedde91
2005-07-07 21:54:02

ST. JOHN'S, Newfoundland -- Ocean temperatures in the North Atlantic hit an all-time high last year, raising concerns about the effects of global warming on one of the most sensitive and productive ecosystems in the world. Sea ice off the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador was below normal for the tenth consecutive year and the water temperature outside St. John's Harbor was the highest on record in 2004, according to a report released Wednesday by the federal Fisheries Department. The...


Latest north Atlantic Reference Libraries

North Atlantic Right Whale, Eubalaena glacialis
2013-08-26 11:17:56

The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis), also known as the black right whale or the northern right whale, is one of three right whales in the Eubalaena genus. It can be found in a small population of about 396 individuals in the western North Atlantic. If it does occur in the eastern North Atlantic, experts assert that it only numbers in the tens, making it nearly extinct in that area. This species migrates into the western North Atlantic to feed in the spring, summer, and fall...

42_6146825547a62b97a0b593bf5aa5b4bd
2006-07-17 18:08:49

The Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a mammal, which belongs to the baleen whale suborder. It is a large whale: an adult usually ranges between 40"“50 ft (12"“16 m) long and weighs approximately 79,000 pounds (36,000 kilograms, or 36 tons. It is well known for its breaching (leaping out of the water) and its unusually long front fins. The Humpback Whale lives in oceans and seas around the world, and is regularly sought out by whale-watchers. Feeding The Humpback Whale...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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