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Latest North Magnetic Pole Stories

lightning strikes affect mountain tops
2013-10-15 10:20:36

[ Watch the Video: Lightning Strikes Can Change Mountains ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Using a simple magnetic compass and a little ingenuity, researchers from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa have found that lighting strikes have a far greater impact on mountaintops than previously thought, according to a report of their experiments in the journal Geomorphology. During powerful thunderstorms, lightning strikes can hit rocks...

Earth's Magnetic Field And Maori Stones
2012-12-09 06:12:00

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Maori of New Zealand have been cooking in earth ovens, called hangi or umu, since at least the 1200s. These ovens are fire pits, scooped out of the ground. A fire is built and large volcanic stones are laid over the fire. When the fire burns down, the food is wrapped in leaves, placed in baskets and laid on the rocks with wet fern fronds. A layer of earth is scraped over the food, sealing in the heat and steam. The stones inside...

Image 1 - 2012: Magnetic Pole Reversal Happens All The (Geologic) Time
2011-12-01 11:41:28

Scientists understand that Earth's magnetic field has flipped its polarity many times over the millennia. In other words, if you were alive about 800,000 years ago, and facing what we call north with a magnetic compass in your hand, the needle would point to 'south.' This is because a magnetic compass is calibrated based on Earth's poles. The N-S markings of a compass would be 180 degrees wrong if the polarity of today's magnetic field were reversed. Many doomsday theorists have tried to take...

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2009-12-23 06:49:54

"Terra firma." It's Latin for "solid Earth." Most of the time, at least from our perspective here on the ground, Earth seems to be just that: solid. Yet the Earth beneath our feet is actually in constant motion. It moves through time and space, of course, along with the other objects in the universe, but it moves internally as well. The powerful forces of wind, water and ice constantly erode its surface, redistributing Earth's mass in the process. Within Earth's solid crust, faulting...

2008-09-25 16:54:39

Every so often, Earth's magnetic field flips on its head, turning the magnetic North Pole into the South Pole and vice versa. It last happened 780,000 years ago, and is predicted to occur again in about 1,500 years ... maybe. The overall frequency is hard to predict - there was one period in Earth's history when the field didn't reverse for 30 million years. Why these flip-flops happen at all is a great riddle, but a new hypothesis on the origins of the magnetic field could...

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2005-12-09 07:05:00

SAN FRANCISCO -- Earth's north magnetic pole is drifting away from North America and toward Siberia at such a clip that Alaska might lose its spectacular Northern Lights in the next 50 years, scientists said Thursday. Despite accelerated movement over the past century, the possibility that Earth's modestly fading magnetic field will collapse is remote. But the shift could mean Alaska may no longer see the sky lights known as auroras, which might then be more visible in more southerly areas...

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2005-04-06 00:45:00

NASA -- Thanks to observations from the ground and satellites in space, scientists know that the North and South Poles light up at night with Auroras because a "solar wind" of electrified gas continually flows outward from the sun at high speed in all directions, including toward the Earth. Recently, however, NASA and university scientists looking at the Earth's northern and southern auroras were surprised to find they aren't mirror images of each other, as was once thought. According to...


Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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