Quantcast

Latest Northern Ireland Stories

2010-06-15 00:45:23

New research from Queen's University Belfast shows the number of paramilitary flags now flown on arterial routes in Northern Ireland during July has more than halved. The figure is down from 161 flags in 2006 to 73 in 2009. The largest proportion of those that were flying in July 2009 belonged to the UVF. The research is contained in a new report Public Displays of Flags and Emblems in Northern Ireland published by the Institute of Irish Studies at Queen's. The study is funded by the Office...

2010-03-16 13:53:03

Those members of Ireland's ethnic minorities who participated in last year's St Patrick's Day parade in Dublin want to be able to express their own cultures more fully in future events. The claim has been made by academics from Queen's University Belfast who have been working with colleagues in the University of Limerick and St Andrews in Scotland on a research project into Irish identities. While the parade participants congratulated the organizers on creating an impressive and inclusive...

2010-03-02 13:43:00

PITTSBURGH March 2 /PRNewswire/ -- TJL Productions announced today that PBS will broadcast WHEN IRISH EYES ARE SMILING - AN IRISH PARADE OF STARS throughout March in celebration of St. Patrick's Day. The latest installment of PBS' popular "My Music" series presents a nostalgic journey back to the 1950s and 1960s featuring long-unseen footage of beloved entertainers singing some of the greatest songs from and inspired by Ireland. The program opens on the streets of Dublin with legendary...

2009-08-03 15:43:09

A play in Belfast, Northern Ireland, can only be seen by five people at a time because it's performed by a pair of actors driving and riding in a Hackney cab. The play, Two Roads West by Laurence McKeown, takes audience members on a tour of two roads, Falls Road and Shankill Road, while protestant driver Bill, played by Vincent Higgins, and Catholic passenger Rosie, played by Carol Moore, play out a drama that underscores the history of the tensions between the Christian factions in Northern...

2009-05-23 12:28:13

A Belfast woman who had not undergone fertility treatments was in stable condition after giving birth to six babies, her doctors in Northern Ireland said. A team of 30 doctors and nurses delivered the babies Friday via Caesarean section within five minutes, The Daily Telegraph reported Saturday. We have planned very carefully for today and today went as well as we had hoped it would, said neonatal consultant Clifford Mayes, who oversaw the team. The four girls and two boys, born 14 weeks...

2009-04-11 05:51:21

The Republic of Ireland, in a concession to Protestants, says Northern Irelanders applying for Irish passports can give Londonderry as their birthplace. The city's name is one of the many issues that divide Republicans and Unionists in Northern Ireland and the Republic from the North. To the Republic and to Catholics in the North, the ancient city is Derry, from an Irish word meaning oak wood. More Northern Irish Protestants have begun seeking Irish passports, The Irish Times reports. The...

63012c848248892640e09bf0b660e00a
2009-04-06 12:30:00

A massive fireball that shot over the skies of Northern Ireland on Sunday may finally be explained due to some security cameras that may have captured the event, BBC News reported. People living as far apart as Donegal and Cork reported seeing a shooting star blazing across the skies around 1230 BST. "We're fairly certain it was a rock from space which could have landed somewhere in Ireland," said David Moore chairman of Astronomy Ireland. Astronomers and sky watchers are hoping to hear from...

cb54efaed999d6433b0eaf1450449ecd1
2009-03-10 10:34:27

The U.S. morning television program Today is planning a special two-day live broadcast from Ireland in honor of St. Patrick's Day, NBC said. On March 16, Today hosts Meredith Vieira and Al Roker will broadcast live from Powerscourt Gardens in County Wicklow, a sprawling country estate and one of Ireland's most famous houses and gardens. The following day, they will broadcast live from The Dublin Castle in Dublin City Centre and from along the route of the St. Patrick's Festival Parade....

4be4d956a0e305e26276dfe37a387f551
2008-12-16 10:50:00

Physicists at the University of Toronto have cracked the mystery behind the strange and uncannily well-ordered hexagonal columns found at such popular tourist sites as Northern Ireland's Giant's Causeway and California's Devil's Postpile, using water, corn starch, and a heat lamp. "The size of the columns, which varies from site to site between a few inches and a few yards, is primarily determined by the speed at which lava from a volcanic eruption cools," says U of T physics professor...

2008-10-13 21:00:25

By KATHRYN TORNEY PUPILS at a Northern Ireland school were sent home today after it was forced to close because of strike action by teachers. The action, involving 25 members of Northern Ireland's largest teaching union the NASUWT, began this morning after a pupil assaulted a teacher at Movilla High School in Newtownards last month. The Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) also confirmed today that it is currently balloting its 10 members at the Co Down school on 'refusal to...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
Related