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Latest Northern long-eared myotis Stories

300860af355fa83166bde6ed4459f879
2011-06-29 11:21:12

Two bat species found in the US are another step closer to being declared an endangered species by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, reprots the Associated Press (AP). Dying off from a devastating fungus that has killed off caves full of bats, the very existence of two bat species is in jeopardy. The agency is launching a 90-day investigation into whether the eastern small-footed bat and the northern long-eared bat need protection under the Endangered Species Act. The two species would be...


Latest Northern long-eared myotis Reference Libraries

Greater mouse-eared bat, Myotis myotis
2013-10-11 08:16:26

The greater mouse-eared bat is primarily found throughout Europe. It weighs about 1.6 ounces, has a wingspan of 14-18 inches and its body is 3-3.5 inches long. The Greater mouse-eared bat has a medium brown upper-body and a greyish belly. This species of bat does not use echolocation for hunting but rather catches its prey from the ground and water surfaces, a process known as gleaning. It finds its prey by listening for the noises that these animals usually make. Its menu consists of...

Northern Long-eared Myotis, Myotis septentrionalis
2012-04-26 06:21:09

The northern long-eared myotis, a member of the vesper bat family, is primarily found in the coniferous forests in Newfoundland to the Yukon and in the southeastern United States, in places like Florida. Some of these bats have been found as far east as Texas and British Columbia. They can weigh between.2 and .4 grams, making it a very small bat. The average body length of the northern long-eared myotis is 3.3 inches. Female northern long-eared myotis bats will usually give birth to only...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.