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Latest Nosema apis Stories

Image 1 - Parasitic Fly Likely Culprit in Bizarre ‘Zombie’ Bee Behavior
2012-01-04 15:08:25

Scientists suspect that a parasitic fly that preys on honey bees could be the cause behind the alarming phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder (CCD), in which thousands of worker bees exhibit bizarre behavior before suddenly vanishing from their colony. Since the problem was first observed in the U.S. in 2006, experts have been attempting to explain the strange ℠zombie-like´ behavior in usually robotically predictable worker bees. European scientists have also joined in to...

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2010-10-08 06:10:00

Researchers have found two new threats in the mysterious colony collapse disorder (CCD) that has affected honey bee populations across the country. The countrywide threat to bees has caused much concern because the insects play an important role in the pollination of crops. Researchers collected samples from beehives affected with the disorder and found the presence of a virus and a fungus. The two pathogens were not found in colonies not affected by CCD, the researchers said. "We truly...

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2010-05-26 06:20:00

US researchers claim to have identified a potential disease responsible for Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) in honeybees, which is responsible for wiping out many beekeepers' entire colonies over the past few years. Scientists from the US Department of Agriculture say the pathogens to blame are a fungus and a family of viruses. Results of the study were presented Tuesday at the 110th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in San Diego, California. Jay Evans of the USDA...

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2010-04-29 06:25:00

The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) said Wednesday that the dramatic die-off of honey bees around the world, threatening crops that rely on the insects for pollination, is not due to any one single factor. The OIE said that a host of issues are plaguing the honey bees - including parasites, viruses, bacterial infections, pesticides, and poor nutrition resulting from the impact of human activities on the environment. Bee colonies naturally lose about 5 percent of their populations...

2009-08-13 15:39:30

U.S. and Belgian scientists say they've found higher levels of pathogens in honeybee colonies affected by colony collapse disorder than in healthy colonies. The researchers said they also found bees in colonies with the collapse disorder are infected with a greater number of pathogens than their non-infected counterparts. However, no individual pathogen can be identified as the cause of the collapse disorder. Colony collapse disorder is described in the online encyclopedia Wikipedia.org as a...

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2009-06-05 07:22:10

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have sequenced the genome of a parasite that can kill honey bees. Nosema ceranae is one of many pathogens suspected of contributing to the current bee population decline, termed colony collapse disorder (CCD). Researchers describe the parasite's genome in a study published June 5 in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens. In 2006, CCD began devastating commercial beekeeping operations, with some beekeepers reporting losses of up to 90 percent,...

2009-04-14 13:50:44

For the first time, scientists have isolated the parasite Nosema ceranae (Microsporidia) from professional apiaries suffering from honey bee colony depopulation syndrome. They then went on to treat the infection with complete success. In a study published in the new journal from the Society for Applied Microbiology: Environmental Microbiology Reports, scientists from Spain analyzed two apiaries and found evidence of honey bee colony depopulation syndrome (also known as colony collapse...