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Latest Noun Stories

Researcher Explores The Illogical Nature Of Language
2013-02-05 07:59:52

Jedidiah Becker for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online When the philosopher and linguist Jeffry Pelletier first handed in his doctoral dissertation in the 1970s, he was unaware his obscure study of a grammatical oddity would eventually open up a new field of research. Now a professor at the University of Alberta, Pelletier argued in his original thesis that natural languages — unlike computer languages or mathematics — do not always accurately or logically describe the...

2011-12-28 11:00:00

Course designed to empower par­tic­i­pants to apply emerg­ing neurosci­ence and tools to enhance brain health and func­tion­al­ity across the lifespan. San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) December 28, 2011 Sharp­Brains, an inde­pen­dent mar­ket research and pub­lish­ing firm track­ing brain fit­ness and applied neu­ro­plas­tic­ity research and mar­ket­place, is offering a new online course designed to equip...

2011-05-13 15:16:05

Parents know the unparalleled joy and wonder of hearing a beloved child's first words turn quickly into whole sentences and then babbling paragraphs. But how human children acquire language-which is so complex and has so many variations-remains largely a mystery. Fifty years ago, linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky proposed an answer: Humans are able to learn language so quickly because some knowledge of grammar is hardwired into our brains. In other words, we know some of the most...

2011-03-15 15:14:45

New research published in Language, the journal of the Linguistic Society of America (LSA) firmly establishes that language learning goes well beyond simple imitation, and in fact that language learners are quite creative and remarkably smart. Not only are learners able to generalize grammatical restrictions to new words in a category "“ in this case, made-up adjectives "“ but they also do not learn these restrictions in situations where they can be attributed to some irrelevant...

2011-02-28 16:00:02

New York University researchers have isolated neural activity that reflects basic mechanisms used by the brain to combine elementary pieces of language in order to construct complex ideas. The study, which appears in the Journal of Neuroscience, was conducted by Douglas Bemis, a graduate student in NYU's Department of Psychology, and Liina Pylkkänen, an associate professor in NYU's Department of Psychology and Department of Linguistics. Researchers have long studied the neural regions...

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2011-01-06 13:37:02

Some dogs may understand that our sounds refer to particular objects Researchers at Wofford College discovered that a Border Collie comprehends the names of over 1000 objects, differentiating between names of objects and orders to fetch them. This research deepens the findings of researchers in Germany, who had discovered a dog that knew the names of a couple of hundred objects. Important questions were left open as to how far a dog could go, and whether the dog really understood that the...

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2010-02-25 11:09:01

Two Spanish psychologists and a German neurologist have recently shown that the brain that activates when a person learns a new noun is different from the part used when a verb is learnt. The scientists observed this using brain images taken using functional magnetic resonance, according to an article they have published this month in the journal Neuroimage. "Learning nouns activates the left fusiform gyrus, while learning verbs switches on other regions (the left inferior frontal gyrus and...

2010-01-13 08:00:00

PITTSBURGH, Jan. 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Two hundred years ago, archaeologists used the Rosetta Stone to understand the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs. Now, a team of Carnegie Mellon University scientists has discovered the beginnings of a neural Rosetta Stone. By combining brain imaging and machine learning techniques, neuroscientists Marcel Just and Vladimir Cherkassky and computer scientists Tom Mitchell and Sandesh Aryal determined how the brain arranges noun representations. Understanding...

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2010-01-14 08:55:00

Two hundred years ago, archaeologists used the Rosetta Stone to understand the ancient Egyptian scrolls. Now, a team of Carnegie Mellon University scientists has discovered the beginnings of a neural Rosetta Stone. By combining brain imaging and machine learning techniques, neuroscientists Marcel Just and Vladimir Cherkassky and computer scientists Tom Mitchell and Sandesh Aryal determined how the brain arranges noun representations. Understanding how the brain codes nouns is important for...

2009-06-26 10:16:05

Historical collections that include everything ever written in a dozen American and British newspapers since they started are now available electronically. Donald MacQueen from Uppsala University, Sweden, has carried out the first comprehensive study that makes use of this resource in order to track changes in language usage, a method that makes it possible to attain an entirely new degree of precision in dating.The gigantic newspaper archives contain news and feature articles as well as...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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