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Latest nuclear transfer Stories

2008-07-04 03:00:08

By Meyer, John R Abstract Katrien Devolder offers a compromise solution for the derivation of human embryonic stem cells that is designed to appease those who consider the killing of human embryos immoral. She proposes to build on a gradualist view of embryonic development in which the embryo merits special respect as human but does not possess ultimate value. Respect for the embryo must be weighed against other values, such as the desires of potential parents and the medical needs of...

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2008-03-24 09:15:00

Researchers have found that therapeutic cloning can be used to treat Parkinson's disease in mice. In their latest study, a team of researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center showed for the first time that therapeutic cloning, or somatic-cell nuclear transfer, was a successful method of treating disease in the same subject from which the initial cells were taken. "It demonstrated what we suspected all along -- that genetically matched tissue works better," said Viviane Tabar, a...

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2008-02-11 19:15:00

UCLA stem cell scientists have reprogrammed human skin cells into cells with the same unlimited properties as embryonic stem cells without using embryos or eggs.Led by scientists Kathrin Plath and William Lowry, UCLA researchers used genetic alteration to turn back the clock on human skin cells and create cells that are nearly identical to human embryonic stem cells, which have the ability to become every cell type found in the human body. Four regulator genes were used to create the cells,...

2007-11-17 15:00:22

The British scientist who broke ground with the cloning of Dolly the sheep in 1996 has embraced a new technology for a non-embryo stem cell production. Professor Ian Wilmut cloned a ewe he named Dolly using a nuclear transfer method whereby stem cells are produced by inserting adult DNA into enucleated embryos and cloning the embryo. Wilmut decided not to pursue a license to clone human embryos following new research by a Japanese team into coaxing stem cells from the skin cells of mice,...

2006-08-17 01:20:00

By James Grubel CANBERRA -- Australian politicians will push to overturn a ban on cloning stem cells for medical research after Australia's conservative Prime Minister John Howard said he would allow a conscience vote on the issue. The issue, to be debated in September, will stir deep moral passions among Australia's politicians and likely divide the ruling Liberal-National Party government soon after an internal revolt forced Howard on Monday to scrap tough new refugee laws. "Putting a bill...

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2006-03-08 13:05:00

LONDON -- His creator has been discredited and controversy has long surrounded him but scientists confirmed on Wednesday that an Afghan hound named Snuppy is the world's first cloned dog. A panel of experts at Seoul National University and researchers in the United States carried out similar DNA experiments using blood samples from Snuppy, the cell donor dog and the surrogate mother. They said the results showed he was cloned by researchers led by disgraced South Korean scientist Hwang...

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2006-02-17 17:15:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent ST. LOUIS -- Stem cell researchers are undeterred by the scandal surrounding falsified South Korean research and said on Friday it is only a matter of time before someone clones a human embryo as a source of the valuable cells. They said the field was moving forward despite opposition from the United States and some other governments, and described progress in understanding how the cells might be used some day to transform medicine. "Regardless...

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2006-01-17 07:50:00

Results reassure those who worried lines created without fertilized embryo might go awry Stem cells taken from cloned embryos are likely to be safe when used for therapeutic purposes, a new study finds. "This is actually really good news," said Tobias Brambrink, lead author of the study and a postdoctoral researcher in the (Rudy) Jaenisch lab at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass. Although the work, which appears online this week in the Proceedings of the...

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2006-01-11 07:50:00

South Korean fraud is disappointing but the dream remains alive, they contend What had once seemed a giant leap for science has turned out to be not even the smallest of steps -- for now. Seoul National University's announcement Tuesday that all of Dr. Hwang Woo-suk's apparently groundbreaking research in human stem cells was faked closes a bitter chapter in the quest to find more and better remedies for human illnesses. Hwang's only legitimate claim is having cloned the world's first dog,...

2006-01-11 00:40:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON -- Meticulous tests like those done to confirm that disgraced Korean scientists legitimately cloned a dog while faking human data may have to be used to validate scientific claims in the future, U.S. scientists said on Tuesday. A panel at Seoul National University concluded that two reports claiming that human embryos had been cloned to provide stem cells had been completely fabricated, but also found that the same team's claims to...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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