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Latest Nucleic acid sequence Stories

nanopore dna sequencing
2014-08-17 02:00:34

Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Gene-based personalized medicine has many possibilities for diagnosis and targeted therapy, but one big bottleneck: the expensive and time-consuming DNA-sequencing process. Now, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found that nanopores in the material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) could sequence DNA more accurately, quickly and inexpensively than anything yet available....

2014-06-06 10:00:13

University of Utah University of Utah researchers find that multiple silent mutations greatly impact protein translation So-called silent DNA mutations earned their title because, according to the fundamental rules of biology, they should be inconsequential. Reported on June 5 in PLOS Genetics online, University of Utah researchers experimentally proved there are frequent exceptions to the rule. The work was conducted in the bacteria, Salmonella enterica, used to study basic biological...

2014-06-05 12:31:26

DUBLIN, June 5, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/s5glmk/isothermal) has announced the addition of the "Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification Technology (INAAT) Market by Application, Products & End-User - Global Forecast to 2018" report to their offering. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769 The isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology (INAAT) market is poised to reach $1,651 million by 2018 at a CAGR of 13.5%...

2014-05-27 11:46:17

University of Bristol An international team of scientists has made a major step forward in our understanding of how enzymes 'edit' genes, paving the way for correcting genetic diseases in patients. Researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Münster and the Lithuanian Institute of Biotechnology have observed the process by which a class of enzymes called CRISPR – pronounced 'crisper' – bind and alter the structure of DNA. The results, published in the Proceedings of the National...

2014-05-16 16:24:29

DALLAS, May 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- According to the new market research report "Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification Technology (INAAT) Market by Application (Infectious Diseases, Blood Screening, Research), Products (Instruments, Reagents), End-User (Hospital, Reference Laboratories, Other) - Global Forecast to 2018", published by MarketsandMarkets, the global Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification Technology (INAAT) Market is poised to reach $1,651 Million by 2018 at a...

2014-05-06 15:10:36

Recent research has shown that tiny fragments of DNA circulating in a person's blood can allow scientists to monitor cancer growth and even get a sneak peek into a developing fetus' gene sequences. But isolating and sequencing these bits of genetic material renders little insight into how that DNA is used to generate the dizzying array of cells, tissues and biological processes that define our bodies and our lives. Now researchers at Stanford University have moved beyond relying on the...

2014-04-08 08:30:12

DUBLIN, April 8, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Dublin - Research and Markets ( http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/tf3qn7/cancer_molecular) has announced the addition of the "Cancer Molecular Biomarkers 2014: A Global Market Study" [http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/tf3qn7/cancer_molecular ] report to their offering. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769 ) Technological advances in molecular biology over the last decade are accelerating...

2014-04-07 16:03:04

Some three billion base pairs make up the human genome—the floor plan of life. In 2003, the Human Genome Project announced the successful decryption of this code, a tour de force that continues to supply a stream of insights relevant to human health and disease. Nevertheless, the primary actors in virtually all life processes are the proteins coded for by DNA sequences known as genes. For a broad spectrum of diseases, proteins can yield far more compelling revelations than may be gleaned...

2014-03-28 09:30:17

Researchers have pinpointed a new mechanism of how natural variation in our DNA alters an individual's risk for developing heart disease by interfering with the ability of a developmental gene to interact with a specialized type of RNA. This work expands on previous work identifying the "hidden" causes of complex disease risk, with the goal of unlocking new pathways and potential drug targets for cardiovascular disease. This latest study led by Thomas Quertermous, MD at Stanford University...

How Well Did You Sequence That Genome?
2014-02-27 13:24:50

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) In December 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first high-throughput DNA sequencer (also known commonly as a "gene sequencer"), an instrument that allows laboratories to quickly and efficiently sequence a person's DNA for genetic testing, medical diagnoses and perhaps one day, customized drug therapies. Helping get the new device approved was another first: the initial use of a reference set of standard genotypes,...


Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'