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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 17:35 EDT

Latest Nutriepigenomics Stories

2014-01-24 13:12:08

Research: First trimester growth restriction and cardiovascular risk factors in school age children: Population based cohort study Poor growth in the first three months of pregnancy is associated with a range of cardiovascular risk factors in childhood, finds a study published on bmj.com today. The findings add to a growing body of evidence and suggest that the first trimester of pregnancy may be a critical period for cardiovascular health in later life. The first trimester of...

2013-12-11 11:44:15

McGill study suggests that a father's diet before conception plays a crucial role in the health of his offspring Mothers get all the attention. But a study led by McGill researcher Sarah Kimmins suggests that the father's diet before conception may play an equally important role in the health of their offspring. It also raises concerns about the long-term effects of current Western diets and of food insecurity. The research focused on vitamin B9, also called folate, which is found...

2013-11-29 13:20:33

New research shows that pre-existing diabetes in pregnant women greatly increases the risk of death of their unborn fetus by around four-and-a-half times compared with pregnant women without diabetes, and also almost doubles the risk of death of infants after birth. The research, published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes), is by Dr Ruth Bell and Peter Tennant, Newcastle University, UK, and colleagues from Newcastle University, and the South...

2013-09-05 11:30:26

Even before they are born, babies accumulate changes in their DNA through a process called DNA methylation that may interfere with gene expression, and in turn, their health as they grow up. But until now it's been unclear just how long these changes during the prenatal period persist. In a new study, researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health establish that signs of DNA methylation persist through early childhood, suggesting...

2013-07-11 15:53:53

-The benefits of this vitamin B source have been demonstrated in an experimental study in rats conducted by scientists at the University of Granada (Spain), Simón Bolívar University (Venezuela) and the University of York (UK). -Choline is found in foodstuffs of animal origin, like eggs and chicken or beef liver, and in vegetable sources like soy and wheat germ. An experimental study in rats has shown that consuming choline, a vitamin B group nutrient found in...

2013-06-18 13:14:30

Methylation refers to a chemical modification of DNA and this modification can occur in millions of positions in the DNA sequence. Until now, scientists believed that this epigenetic phenomenon actively reduced the expression of certain genes. Today, a team of researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, led by Emmanouil Dermitzakis, Louis-Jeantet Professor at the Faculty of Medicine, reveals that this is not always the case and that DNA methylation may play both a passive...

2013-03-22 09:31:23

Food and environment can chemically alter your gene function and scientists have identified a gene that is consistently altered in obesity. The gene LY86 was among a group of 100 genes identified as likely contributors to obesity through genome-wide association studies comparing the DNA of thousands of obese and lean individuals, said Dr. Shaoyong Su, genetic epidemiologist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University. Su looked at progressively larger groups of obese...

2013-02-11 15:08:18

In a study to be presented on February 15 between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting , in San Francisco, California, researchers from Tufts Medical Center will present findings showing the effects of maternal obesity on a fetus, specifically in the development of the brain. The study, conducted at the Mother Infant Research Institute (MIRI) at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, Mass., looked at the fetal development of 16...

2013-02-06 12:20:26

A father's obesity is one factor that may influence his children's health and potentially raise their risk for diseases like cancer, according to new research from Duke Medicine. The study, which appears Feb. 6 in the journal BMC Medicine, is the first in humans to show that paternal obesity may alter a genetic mechanism in the next generation, suggesting that a father's lifestyle factors may be transmitted to his children. "Understanding the risks of the current Western lifestyle on...