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Latest Obsessive–compulsive disorder Stories

2010-02-02 08:24:11

In people with body dysmorphic disorder, distorted self-image could be the result of the brain's abnormal processing of visual input Everyone checks themselves in the mirror now and then, but that experience can be horrifying for individuals suffering from body dysmorphic disorder, or BDD, a psychiatric condition that causes them to believe, wrongly, that they appear disfigured and ugly. These people tend to fixate on minute details "” every tiny blemish looms huge "” rather than...

2010-02-01 18:20:21

Brain scans reveal differences in the way the brains of individuals with body dysmorphic disorder"”a psychiatric condition that causes patients to believe they appear disfigured and ugly"”respond to images of their own faces, according to a report in the February issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) affects approximately 1 percent to 2 percent of the population, according to background information in the...

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2010-01-06 14:11:39

Gene shares family with recently targeted gene for autism A canine chromosome 7 locus that confers a high risk of compulsive disorder susceptibility has been identified through a collaboration between the Behavior Service at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, the Program in Medical Genetics at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the Broad Institute at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The findings are published in the January 2010 edition of Molecular...

2009-10-27 16:27:45

Deep brain stimulation may be a safe and effective treatment for Tourette syndrome, according to research published in the October 27, 2009, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "Our findings hold promise for helping people with severe Tourette syndrome, who are in need of new treatment options to improve their quality of life," said study author Andrea Cavanna, MD, of the University of Birmingham, in the United Kingdom. It is...

2009-10-05 10:23:00

PROVIDENCE, R.I., Oct. 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Butler Hospital in Providence, R.I., is leading a clinical study evaluating the effectiveness and safety of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Benjamin D. Greenberg, MD, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry at Butler Hospital and the Alpert Medical School of Brown University, is the lead investigator. He noted, "In the most severe cases, OCD causes profound impairment in work and social life, as well as...

2009-10-01 09:59:21

New research shows that streptococcal infection does not appear to cause or trigger Tourette syndrome or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The research is published in the September 30, 2009, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "These results do not confirm other, smaller studies done in the US, which found an association between strep infection and these brain disorders," said study author Anette Schrag, MD, of the...

2009-09-30 13:09:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., Sept. 30 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new research center exploring the science underlying a potential new treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder has been established at the University of Rochester Medical Center, thanks to a $10.5 million award from the National Institute of Mental Health. Rochester will serve as the hub of a five-year collaborative effort that includes six institutions around the nation and in Puerto Rico. The prestigious Silvio O. Conte Center...

2009-09-28 10:36:00

Unique collaboration between WSU, the University of Michigan and Hospital for Sick Children/University of Toronto will examine role of glutamate more closely DETROIT, Sept. 28 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Wayne State University officials announced today an expansion of a research grant of nearly $2.7 million, bringing the total award to over $6.1 million. This project, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health at the National Institutes of Health, is the first combined imaging...

2009-09-10 13:43:52

Those with Alzheimer's disease or obsessive-compulsive disorder may be trapped in routines and kept from adapting to new environments, U.S. researchers say. Senior author Michael Platt Duke of University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., says brain scans in monkeys indicated nerve cells in the part of the brain known as the posterior cingulate cortex fire up more strongly when the monkeys decided to explore new alternatives. The experiment began with the monkeys being given four rewards to...

2009-09-06 08:03:43

Sticking with what you know often comes at the price of learning about more favorable alternatives. Managing this trade-off is easy for many, but not for those with conditions such as Alzheimer's disease or obsessive-compulsive disorder who are trapped in simple routines. Using brain scans in monkeys, Duke University Medical Center researchers are now able to predict when monkeys will switch from exploiting a known resource to exploring their options. "Humans aren't the only animals who...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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